Haunt Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
guys have a newer air compressor the instructions are missing, when I turn off the compressor to store it for weeks/months, do I have to let the air out of the tank?


also this is small tank 8 gallons, plan on adding storage tanks at my bigger props (when I build them), but won't the tank always be running to fill these storage tanks anyway?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
Hi Punch,

I've been using compressors for 20 years. I myself tend to always leave some amount of air in the tank, if anything, just for the convenience of being able to just walk up to it and grab the hose to add air to my car tires. I hate having to wait for the tank to charge up..LOL I don't see that it would hurt it at all, but if it won't be used for a long time, I certainly would reach underneath the tank and drain the water from the tank from the release valve. In case you don't know, there should be some air in the tank so the air pressure being released will also help shoot as much water out as possible.

As for your second question, having a good supply of air as close as possible to the pneumatic prop ensures that adequate pressure is available for the best triggered effect, especially if the compressor is far away from the props causing you to have a very long pneumatic hose run. I very much doubt the compressor will be running all that much to maintain proper charge to the second storage tank. Unless you're going to have loads of kids constantly walking by, I wouldn't worry about it. Take lots of photos for us :::smiles:::
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
for about $10 more than a propane tank you can just get a portable air tank from sears or any other hard ware store and change the fittings on it to act as a great resivor tank for each prop. I am weird though and don't like hacking things into other things, like propane tanks into air tanks or door closers into pneumatic cylinders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
Hi Dr. Morbius,

I agree with Gadget on this one. Unless I'm very mistaken, a propane tank is not designed to handle the higher pressures that an actual air tank is designed for. If I were you, I'd go with a 5 or 10 gallon air tank with an air gauge. Harbor Freight sells both sizes. If they are more money than you'd like to spend, you may be able to find something similar online. Two links to each size tank from Harbor Freight are below.

Also, not to be long winded, the Sit-up pneumatic I used last Halloween has a double acting Bimba 6" cylinder. My compressor is a Sear 6 HP electric with a 30 gallon air tank. I had the motion sensor adjusted so that even if a car drove by my home, it would activate to prop. So you could imagine how much use it would get each day. In spite of the ghosting problem with it, for each single trigger, it would raise and lower about 8x. Even with all that unnecessary triggering, my 30 gallon air tank would only require one complete charge each day. This should give you a very good indication, assuming your pneumatics don't ghost, how little air you'll need. My point is that unless you'll be adding 3 or 4 pneumatics, you may not require huge air reservoir tanks.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=41712

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40057
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,682 Posts
Is it a good idea to drain the water from the tank before each use, would that help on building the pressure faster?
I see there is a valve on the 8 gal tank we have that is electric, and it seems to take forever to build pressure, but i will have to look on the fill your own air one not sure on that. < maybe those dont have one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
Hi Lilly,

Yes, you should always check and drain water from the tank prior to use. For the most part, you'll find a great deal of water inside the tank during warm or humid days and is normal for this to happen. Water or condensation accumulating in the reservoir tank has nothing to do with how long it takes for the tank to charge. The slow charge is normal for Sears Craftsman compressors and are not designed to charge quickly as they are not commercial duty. I have a Sears electric 6hp, 30 gallon type and it still takes several minutes to full charge to 135 PSI. I believe it would take a dual head compressor to charge faster.

The link below shows an inline water/air filter that I use on my compressor in order to eliminate any chance of water infiltration in my pneumatic tools, most especially when I use the compressor for painting my life size props. You would still need to drain the tank from the valve on the bottom, this filter simply removes any water or debris that can and will make it through the supply line to your tools or pneumatic props.

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/prod...ubcat=Air+Tool+Accessories&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,682 Posts
Thanks Richie..good to know
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top