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Discussion Starter #1
I thought I share a little secret some of you may already know. I get a lot of free metal by using bed frames. I tell all my friend's and family to be on the look out and it seems someone's usually bringing me one every 2 week's or so and now I have a small stockpile of metal. Saves a lot of money. I not sure how many of you do your own welding but I enjoy it. I went out and bought a MillerMatic MIG welder and it's a perfect for welding small to large project's. I haven't taken a lot of pictures of past projects, but now that I'm a member here at this forum I plan on taking a lot more than before and sharing them for all to see.
 

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With a small 120V MIG welder like TD described, you'll learn very fast. I have one of the same series (Millermatic) and they're great. It's nowhere near as hard as stick arc welding. And with the house-current welders, the arc is a lot less intense than the 240V kind, so you don't have to worry about wearing leathers to avoid the sunburn.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I actually did get the 240v, just incase I needed it for a bigger job. But I do agree Revenant, thier great machines. I used a stick welder since 1987 but changed to MIG a little over a year ago and there's no turning back now.
 

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Hillbilly Wrangler
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okay well since i have no idea which is which ...could you explain the difference between a mig and a stick and why you would want to use which for each job. THANKS
 

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A "stick" arc-welder is the kind most people think of when they picture a welder; the person holds an electrode that has a long skinny stick poking out of it that they contact the metal with. All the sparks and action happen at the end of the stick. The stick's the electrode; the arc that melts the steel forms between the end of it and the metal you're welding. The electrode is consumed by the process so you have a container full of sticks and you keep replacing them as you work. It's tricky because you you have to sort of float the electrode over the surface of the steel; if you actually touch the steel, the end of the electrode fuses to the steel and the arc stops. You have to break it off and fire it up again. I suck at stick welding; I fuse that electrode all the time and it's just aggravating. The real strength of it is that you get a very deep burn welding that way; you can weld the really thick structural steel.

The other, easier type of arc welding is with a wire-feed welder (MIG welding is a sort of wire-welding). Instead of sticks, the electrode is a spool of steel wire inside the machine that feeds through the handle and thus replenishes itself while you weld. It doesn't fuse as often if you have your feed speed and power settings adjusted correctly; so it's a lot easier if you're an infrequent weldor like me that doesn't weld often enough to really develop a talent for it LOL. With a MIG machine (Metal & Inert Gas), there's a tank of inert gas that flows out the nozzle where the wire pokes out, so the arc is happening in its own little puddle of inert atmosphere, so the molten metal doesn't oxidize and slag doesn't form on the weld (with stick welding, you need a little steel chipping hammer to chip and scrape the welds clean). When you get good, you get clean, slagless, almost shiny welds that look like fresh-squeezed toothpaste. Very tidy.

What type of welder you want depends on what you'll be welding. 240V machines are much more powerful (obviously) than 120V ones, so you can weld thicker steel. Stick-type welders are less expensive machines (fewer moving parts) and enable you to weld heavier stuff, but it really helps to get training because their trickier to use. MIG welders are much more expensive but easier to use, give prettier, cleaner welds, and enable you to work on thinner, smaller steel without burning huge holes in it. I have a smaller machine than TD because I never weld anything over 3/16" or 1/4" thick. But on the flip side I can crank down the power and weld very thin sheet metal; you could never do that with a stick arc welder. For haunt and hobby purposes you can get by with the little mini MIG like I have; a bigger one like TD enables you to weld on really heavy stuff like car frames.
 

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good explanation Rev..
I've been thinking of getting a welder also ,I have a project in mind I've been wanting to do for a few yrs.
 

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Panic time is here!
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I didn't even know that you could wel at home. Learn something new every day. I still don't even own a saw. I got to get with the program.
 

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A word on Welding, I would advise that if you want to learn to weld is to take some classes. Welding with stick, mig or gas for that matter can be very dangerous. I don’t want to scare you not to try it. I just don’t want anyone to get hurt.

When you apply a great deal of heat to metal a lot of things can happen. You can get some guidance on the different makes and models of welder on the market. This is the kind of stuff you can learn is just a couple of classes. Than you can decide if you want you spend the money for a welder. You will be far a head of just walking into your local sears and buying a welder.

I am sure that the members that have and use welders will second this advise.
 

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Thank You guys for enlighting us on the right welder to use as well as the pro's and con's to them,I learning something everyday the learning never stops.
Now I know who to ask to fix my bed,lol
 

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Bed frames for angle iron

Just wanted to throw out, while bed frames are a great resource for angle, that angle is actually very affordable. Now, that is if you DO NOT purchase it at Home Depot, Lowes, or an other home center that charges you $15 for a 6' length...

I go to King Metals most of the time, where I pick up 14 gauge 1.5" angle, almost exaclty what a bed frame is, for about $11 for a 24 foot length. Just check out the steel distributors in your area, probably much cheaper than you thought!

I also pick up the 20' lengths of 14 gauge 1.25" square tubing for about $14 each there as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Can't beat curbies though, LOL. That's a good idea though, I'm going to check what the frames are going for right now in my area. The last time I checked at ArtVan they were around $99 for a king, don't know the others.
 
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