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Fortunately for us, the lawn display is not considered an Attraction per se.

I have however done the local grade school's "Haunted Gym" fundraiser last year and this year. I decided to work closely with the local fire inspector to stick to the rules as close as possible (Save Headaches). They allowed us to use 4 Mil plastic for the walls as it met their fire resistance spec's (We had to test it with the fire department and provide MSDS info). I did the maze design with with the rules in mind and things worked out great. We opened with 0 fire code violations as opposed to the 58 they had the last time the attraction was run (5 years ago).

Couple of Indiana rules:

1) Guides - over 18 and equipped with flashlights
2) Exits - every room must have an emergency exit and hallways must lead to a room equipped with emergency exits.
3) Overhead sprinklers and fire alarms - All rooms must be equipped with both (Gym already had them in place, just couldn't put a roof on the whole thing)
4) Fire resistant material. 4 Mil Visqueen type building sheet material met minimum standards for fire resistance.
5) All outlets must be attached to GCFI.

I had to provide a copy of plans of the attraction indicating the locations of exits, outlets and fire extinguishers. There was an inspection of the whole attraction one hour before opening with all lighting and props active. I also joined with the local fire department's food drive charity and got a couple of firefighters to hang around for the nights in question which made things easier. The inspectior even offered to allow us to use fog machines if we wanted. I didn't last year but I ordered a gallon of fast dissapating fluid from Gorey Minion and I think we are going to give it a shot this year.

RandalB
 

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It depends on what kind of smoke detector you have (ionization or photoelectric).

A ionization smoke detector testes the chemical makeup of the air and the fog should not trigger it.

A photoelectric smoke detector uses a beam of light and the fog can break the beam and trigger the alarm.
Interested in this, any additional information available? Links or such? The local school where I have my charity haunt uses ionization detectors and the local Fire Department says the fog will set them off...

RandalB
 
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