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I know that the standard in making tombstones is Foam sheets, and alot of people print out how their epitaphs look then transfer them onto the sheets by making a tracing of it with a needle or something then connect the dots. Has anyone tried printing your text on Iron-on material and ironing on the letters that way, or would the heat from the iron melt the foam. Just kind of curious if anyone has tried that.
 

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I never tried the iron on transfer method. I work with white beaded styrofoam so I would think that the iron would melt the foam. I've made T-shirts in the past with transfers and it takes approx. 1 min of ironing on high heat while pressing down firmly. Not sure how the blue or pink foam would work as I've never used it.
Let us know how it works out if you try this method.
 

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I think with an iron it would prob melt it too but never tried it.
maybe try and figure out something to cover the item with and then use iron hopfully enough heat willpass thru but not melt the foam..heavy duty foil maybe or a towel of somekind. I don't know really.
good question.
 

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I am going to try my hot glue letters..I like the words to stick out sometimes instead of set in.
something like this but bigger and prob in print not cursive
 

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Wintergreen transfer

The method we use to transfer designs to foam for creating our tombstones is the "wintergreen transfer" method. This works great with designs printed on a standard laser printer. We print of our designs in REVERSE, as the transfer creates a negative image. We then mount the design on the foam, with the print side in contact with the foam surface, and apply peppermint oil to the design from the back of the paper. This results in transferring the toner to the foam. We then carve out the design in the foam and paint. If you Google "wintergreen transfers", you can find details on the process and other solvents to use. Wintergreen oil is traditional, but peppermint oil is easier to find in our area. You should use do this in a well-ventilated area. Especially if you don't care for the scent of mint.

Happy haunting.

Eon
 

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cool idea Eon
 

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Thanks Eon for that info. Now if I just had a laser printer and wintergreen oil. I did a google search on the "wintergreen transfer" and there are some very interesting things you can do with this stuff. Definately going to have to try this. Maybe when I'm off for the summer from work.
 

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Pyro,

It should work with most porous surfaces, although I haven't tried it other than on paper or extruded foam. May not work well on metals or plastics, but give it a try. I expect it works on unfinished wood surfaces.
 

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Thats interesting Eon. Will have to try that.

I remember reading a few years back on one of the email halloween lists that with certain printer ink you can print out your images in reverse and apply rubbing alchohol to the flip side and get it to transfer to the foam. I dont recall any other details about it and have never tried it myself...
 

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I would imagine that alcohol would work with most photocopies, DS... most copiers I know of use methanol-based toner (at least they used to), so alcohol should redissolve it... in theory anyway
 

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Is that rubbing alcohol?
 

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Methanol is wood alcohol and rubbing alcohol is isopropyl, but I figured alcohol is alcohol. My theory was wrong about the photocopies though. I just got home and tested it on an old photocopy and the letters didn't transfer. Maybe it would work with inkjet ink; I don't have a printer so I can't test it. Anyone else?
 

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I know that the standard in making tombstones is Foam sheets, and alot of people print out how their epitaphs look then transfer them onto the sheets by making a tracing of it with a needle or something then connect the dots. Has anyone tried printing your text on Iron-on material and ironing on the letters that way, or would the heat from the iron melt the foam. Just kind of curious if anyone has tried that.
frstvamp1r: Here's my two cents :googly: When I made my first ever prop---a tombstone for the tombstone contest last June, http://www.hauntforum.com/showthread.php?t=2574 --- I used the pink polystyrene foam. The bat was "burned" into the foam using a tool called "The Creative Versa-tool" Here's a link for it.

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/displayProductPage?productNum=gc0001

So I would think that the heat from the iron would melt the foam.

What I did for my lettering is decided what I wanted, printed it out, taped it to the foam, and cut into the foam
through the paper with an x-acto knife held at an angle. That way the letters popped out of the foam when I was done.
You could also try to make yourself a stencil out of the stencil blanks or a few pieces of thick posterboard glued together. Good Luck frstvamp1r :D
 

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I us an engraver to outline the letters. Then, I use a dremel to cut out the letters.

The engraver is easy to control, like a pen.
 

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2 other methods to transfer
1 cut your printed leters out and use an airbrush to paint the letter on like a stencil.
2 put the foam under or in front of and opaque projector with your text in the project and trace with vine charcoal.
3. print out your letters then place on a light box, bright window, or tv screen on a no staion channle and trace the lettering with vine charcoal. Now place the back side down on the foam and go over the front with a pointed opject. The charcoal will remain behind on the foam...
Oh that was 3 .. sorry
 
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