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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last year, my dad & I decided to do a "Haunted Woods" on the 7 acres we own. It is sort of like a haunted house, except it is set outdoors in the woods. As an added bonus, the property is actually located on a street named "Cemetery Lane" and sits between two actual cemetery sites.Everything went as well as it could for a bunch of amateurs their first year LOL. The first year was really about deciding if we liked it and wanted to make it an annual attraction. We loved it. I joined this forum in hopes of gaining inspiration, ideas, and guidance from some of you guys that have been doing this for years. My imagination is pretty big, and my dad can build anything. Together we made some pretty cool stuff last year. But, I want to make all of our scenes/themes different every year. I am new to this business as an owner, but I have been going to these types of attractions since I was a kid. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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The obviouse is a cemetary, set in such a way to get the view of one of.the existing cemetarys. Build a couple of ground breakers. Got to have the fog. Lights parts of your.path with Tiki torches. Make a closed in tunnel like path out a lot of sticks and branches and then hide something in there. Use motion sensing lights to keep the trail ahead dark until it needs to be seen.

There is just a few ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We used the tiki torches last year, and I also had burn barrels at points in the trail so that my actors could warm up near their spots. I loved the fire light effect, but our trail is pretty long. We have a never ending supply of fire wood though, and 10.00 worth of fuel for the torches every weekend was totally worth it for the effect. We also used fog machines for our cemetery scene. The actual cemetery closest to the property is visible, but we didn't use it out of respect. We just built our own. But, I think this year I am going to make fog chillers for a couple of them. I think the low lying fog combined with the regular "in the air fog" will have a creepier effect. I loved the idea for the motion lights though, I didn't think about doing that! Last year I had actors in certain spots flick the lights on or off, the motion lights will save time & wear on my actors. I already had the tunnel idea in my head, just trying to figure out where to put it. Last year we did an awesome "Camp Crystal Lake" scene in one part. I made the old looking camp sign out of barn wood, mounted on 12 foot poles as you entered, just like the movie. We pulled in an old camper and an old trailer, set up the whole camp site scene, complete with log benches & a camp fire burning. It worked out great. My "Jason" popped out at random, sometimes out of the camper or trailer, sometimes behind some trees. Every part of the trail had various scenes set up from horror movies, as that was our theme. The Ring was first, followed by Halloween, a Cemetery Scene, Camp Crystal lake, Dr. Slaughter, then the clown from It at the end. We also had some werewolves scattered about at random and just creepy actors in masks. I want to keep Micheal Myers as a permanent character because so many people we afraid of him. However, I want to change all the rest, make it different every year. Any ideas for themes?
 

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Shy of setting up tents for "rooms", and the amount of room you may have for storing props, I can see some issues coming with trying to change the whole theme from year to year. I'd be worried about the open flames too. Actors or guests getting burned, or starting a forrest fire just sounds like a lawsuit looking for a place to happen, not to mention the actual injuries or damage that may occur. Sorry, I don't mean to sound so depressing, but I know it's easy to get carried away when it comes to ideas.
What is the availability of power throughout your forrest/trail?
What kind of manpower/number of actors do you have?
What kind of budget do you have to work with?
What kind of storage space do you have for props and such?
What kind of skills do you and your builders have? (pneumatic, electronics, carpentry, airbrush, faux finishing, makeup, plumbing, welding, etc.)
 

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Shy of setting up tents for "rooms", and the amount of room you may have for storing props, I can see some issues coming with trying to change the whole theme from year to year. I'd be worried about the open flames too. Actors or guests getting burned, or starting a forrest fire just sounds like a lawsuit looking for a place to happen, not to mention the actual injuries or damage that may occur. Sorry, I don't mean to sound so depressing, but I know it's easy*to get carried away when it comes to ideas.
What is the availability of power throughout your forrest/trail?
What kind of manpower/number of actors do you have?
What kind of budget do you have to work with?
What kind of storage space do you have for props and such?
What kind of skills do you and your builders have? (pneumatic, electronics, carpentry, airbrush, faux finishing, makeup, plumbing, welding, etc.)
Just piping in on fire safety.

Many pro haunts use live fire with great success.

Not sure if anyone know of these next suggestions as common sense or not. Part of my background is working for a place that holds a couple of outdoor festivals each year that are based around fire. This place glows at night with the amount of tiki torches and campfires. On Saturday night the make a bonfire that can be seen over treetops. Obviously those that work here have extensive training in fire safety. I was also of volunteer firefighter for a while as well.

These steps should be taken. Tiki torches should be well fastened to wooden stakes or rebar hammered far enough into the ground to from accidentaly falling.

Open camp fire like fires should not be accessable to the customer. A 5 gallon bucket of water should be at each location where a fire like this is used.

Always keep loose material away from the fire.

Do not burn if it is windy.

Actors in these areas should know how to put out a fire.

before we start discouraging poeple from doing something that they have already done and is excepted by some of the insurence companies that a lot of the pro haunts use. Some haunts would not be able to operate without the use.of things like Tiki torches. On my year off from haunting last year, I visited a very large haunt with multiple attractions spread accross a very large festival geound. One attraction was completely lit by tiki torches. In the main area between attractions they had small fires in metal fire pots for people to warm up at.

Enough ranting. There is my $.02
 

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You seem to have several scenes that could be easily incorporated into a larger narrative. You have a cemetery already in sight, and "extending" it into your haunt has been suggested and is brilliant.

You asked for scenes you could include in your haunted wood. I have some thoughts on that.

Are the woods naturally scary? Why? I think because they are not tamed, they are not "smooth", and nature cares not one whit for us and our big brains. Stuff in the woods will eat us, and we cannot see it coming. It's not arranged for our convenience, and our hyperactive imaginations see all kinds of patterns in the trees and shadows.

I have a story in my mind. I wonder if you will see it too. Will the guests be self led or have a guide? I like the guide, though it is not necessary. With or without a guide, they should be told that whatever happens, keep moving down the trail. A groundskeeper has lived here for years in a small cottage on the trail, and they can go to him if they need help.

Fog is everywhere. Firelight illuminates the way. Our two guides - why are they armed? - lead the way. Or maybe they just tell us the way. Cowards.

1. Eyes.
I have a few thoughts about eyes. First, eyes watching you are generally creepy. You can make eyes that seem to follow the guests pretty easily and cheaply. Here's a LINK.
We see a set here and there at random along the trail, in bushes and even up in the trees.

Then a kind of "dot room" - maybe an actual room, but even better if it's an enclosure of woven sticks and vines. Of course, the dots would be eyes. They don't even have to be hollow face eyes - just glowing stickers with pupils. Be sure to vary the pupil types. Anyway, like any other dot room, an actor is camouflaged in the scene, and scares them.
Blinking glowing eyes like THESE watch at various points along the trail.
I saw a huge board once that had a thousand nails in it. On each hung a small reflective circle. The overall effect suggested water as stray winds made them move and reflect the light differently. Could something like that, on a smaller scale, make convincing eyes here and there? Maybe nailed to trees, or boards on trees, in pairs?

2. Off the trail over there is a ghost. We know it's a ghost because although it looks like a woman, we can see straight through her. Chicken Wire Ghost
Basically, it's a human figure made of chicken wire so you can see through it. My thought it it could be painted in glow in the dark paint and illuminated with a blacklight. That would be cool. If you light the rest of the scene with a red flood light, it will be clear that they are seeing through the figure. A strategically placed limb or something in front of the red light could cast a shadow on the form, preventing the red and UV from interfering with one another.

3. Axworthy ghost.
a specral shape zips in front of some trees and behind others, in and out of hidden UV LED mini spots. In case you need it, here's a LINK. OK, maybe two.

4. Werewolf. What would a haunted woods be without a werewolf? Or werebear, though I doubt you'd find many who would see enough to know the difference. Check this out - I just was directed to a LINK showing how to make a girl turn into a gorilla before their eyes. How easy to make it a woman into a werewolf? Maybe in her human form, she tells how 20 years ago tonight she lost her little girl to the horror of the woods? Maybe they were picnicking not far from here. Her husband had gone back to the car for a surprise. A beast attacked them and the girl ran into the woods while she - the mother - tried in vain to fight the beast. Where is she? Then she changes into a beast. The werewolf "Attacks"! How cool would it be if the werewolf was a played by a man much larger than the woman? Wearing strips of fabric like the woman had on, of course. How cool if she was one of two guides? Assuming they were there to begin with. Cowards. With the wolf behind, the only thing to do is move forward.

5. Birds. Dollar store crows can be painted different shades to create many different birds. Do they move? Depends on your budget. Sound effects, my friend.

6. FCG - Another old standby that I think would be even better in the woods. Here's one LINK, in case you are unfamiliar. So, why not expand the basic plan to make it a giant spider? Spiders live in the woods. A nest of spiders would be a creepy think to walk into on a trail. Sure, you can have a bunch of web and fakes spiders of all kinds, but a giant spider bobbing up and down and moving its legs individually? Yeah. A "Spider victim" prop is a classic. Can we just make out that the victim is dressed like the guides?

7. Levitating girl. If you have an actor who is willing to stand on a platform secured to a tree, you can make her levitate there. Just dress her in a white dress - except her white stockings and shoes are stuffed with pool noodles and are in front of her real legs - which are all in flat black. She should be clearly off the ground, and the white legs should extend below the platform. Everything should be flat black but the parts you want to appear to be part of her. UV helps here. She can bob a bit to help the illusion, and ask for help. She is lost and scared, and wants to find her mommy and daddy. they are lost, too.

A peppers Ghost could be used instead of an actor, though to really sell it, it needs to be triggered only when the guests get to the scene.

In my mind, she's dressed in an overly frilly dress, inappropriate for the woods. One half of her face is torn, as if by claws. She would turn that part away from the guests at first. Then she would turn to face them. I imagine her eyes getting wide, looking behind the guests, and she says "Mommy?" Then the werewolf roars and charges again! Unfortunately, the other guide never had a chance to draw a weapon before being killed. Find the groundskeeper! Assuming the guides came this far. Cowards.

8. Trees. Nothing scary about trees, right? They are everywhere, and pretty much succumb to whatever we wish to do to them. Not walking trees! Standing there, minding their own business until a bunch of guests stumble upon them unaware. Then they move, making horrific noises and bringing the woods to life! Of course, you could do other haunted trees throughout the haunt. I personally would save it for later though. THIS is what I would do earlier.

9. The grounds keeper. The cottage is not exactly what we expect. More of a shack - or even a shanty. skins nailed to the walls. Is that one human? Stains on the ground. An axe - not in a stump, but in the wall. claw marks on the rotting boards. The door bursts open, and there he is, chainsaw roaring! "Where is she!?!?!" he screams "Tell me!!!" Whoa. Let's get out of here!

10. Almost done. There are the lights marking the exit. A roar from the left. It's the werewolf, attacking! A roar from the right - it's a chainsaw! Run! Only as we flee do we realize the wolf and groundskeeper are battling each other. They crash into the dark, and all goes silent.

Time to go home.

I know there are all kinds of ideas out there for lighting and sound effects and whatnot. I refer you to Revenant and his Theater of the Mind segment on HauntCast, where he recommended a soundtrack that would allow even the blind to know what is happening in each scene.

None of these ideas are original to me, but I hope in presenting them here I have helped in some way.
 

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we always use tiki torches but we replace the inside with fake flame candles. works great for the guest. We also make our costumes larger so the guest can be dressed warm and slide the costume over their coats etc. This year we will have triple the volunteers so my mind is racing with ideas. We are more into non-stop scares and setting the scare up rather than props etc. but this year we are adding lit up scenes as decoys to add more to the haunt.A lot of People couldn't make it through last year and I know the new location will be scarier than before. Just hope the weather is ok.
 

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wow, JustJimAZ, great ideas, makes me want to have a wooded haunt, hummm, going to have to ponder them and how I can use some of them in a campground haunt,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
 

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wow, JustJimAZ, great ideas, makes me want to have a wooded haunt, hummm, going to have to ponder them and how I can use some of them in a campground haunt,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
High praise, Bethene! I wonder why one could not build the transformation illusion in a tent or camper?

I would guess most of the other stuff would fit in in a campground too. Lost girl, groundskeeper, monster spiders and glowing eyes... Plus a little "Deliverance" scene near a fire.:eek:
 

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I have not tried it but I saw it online. A small pit built into your path about 2 feet deep and covered with plexiglass make your TOT walk over it. Now all you do is add snakes, big spiders, raccoons, kittens, anything scary. Real or fake would work, leave air holes for live critters. Make it overly tuff with 4"x4" frame.
Good Luck
 

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I have not tried it but I saw it online. A small pit built into your path about 2 feet deep and covered with plexiglass make your TOT walk over it. Now all you do is add snakes, big spiders, raccoons, kittens, anything scary. Real or fake would work, leave air holes for live critters. Make it overly tuff with 4"x4" frame.
Good Luck
Or a bottomless pit. They are easy to build but can get pricy. The plexy for the top needs to be really thick, not available at your local home depot.
 

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Or a bottomless pit. They are easy to build but can get pricy. The plexy for the top needs to be really thick, not available at your local home depot.
A bottomless pit WOULD be pretty cool. Especially if it was on a pressure switch so it did not light up until they were in the middle.
 

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A bottomless pit WOULD be pretty cool. Especially if it was on a pressure switch so it did not light up until they were in the middle.
Or I read about one on this forum a while back about building the bottomless pit with a pepper ghost affect under it. Using the see mirror at the bottom as well with some that is suddenly lit underneath that appear in the middle of the pit.
 

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Personally, I think the woods at night at Halloween is scary enough. Use that as a starting point; I'd have strange and horrible creatures following guests around at points through out the trail, along with maybe having non-actors (ticket takers, etc) wear skull-makeup and white hooded robes with spooky runes painted on them in blood (gives it that "Satanic" feeling). The scenes on the trail don't have to be related themeaticaly, but I think a story line helps. Scenes I think would work well include Ed Gein-style cannibal house (avoid the cliche of chainsaws), graverobbery-in-progress, creepy devil-worshipping ceremony in the woods, witch's pumpkin patch, and long abandoned cemetery. Hope this helps. Just one more thing: you'll need a good, strong name for your haunt. Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Shy of setting up tents for "rooms", and the amount of room you may have for storing props, I can see some issues coming with trying to change the whole theme from year to year. I'd be worried about the open flames too. Actors or guests getting burned, or starting a forrest fire just sounds like a lawsuit looking for a place to happen, not to mention the actual injuries or damage that may occur. Sorry, I don't mean to sound so depressing, but I know it's easy to get carried away when it comes to ideas.
What is the availability of power throughout your forrest/trail?
What kind of manpower/number of actors do you have?
What kind of budget do you have to work with?
What kind of storage space do you have for props and such?
What kind of skills do you and your builders have? (pneumatic, electronics, carpentry, airbrush, faux finishing, makeup, plumbing, welding, etc.)
Ok, let me address these one by one LOL.

* STORAGE- we have an entire empty 1 bedroom mobile home that we gutted just for storage for the woods so it could be moved on site. We also have two large enclosed sheds available for storage, as well as my full size garage and finished basement. So, we pretty much have unlimited storage space LOL.

* FIRE SAFETY- We are very careful, and thankfully H was a fire fighter. As far as the fires go, we have a ton truck equipped with a 100 gallon tank ( I think that is the size, it really big) and a really long hose ( don't remember how many feet that thing is ) for extinguishing the fires. We also have fire extinguishers on hand near every burn barrel in case of an emergency.The larger fires are in contained metal burn barrels, with the exception of one that was needed to actually have the look of a real camp fire for our Camp Crystal Lake scene. That one was on the ground in a dug out pit with river rock around it. Our tiki torches are not just the wooden stakes in the ground. Ours are supported by thick metal poles as well. Those babies are pounded in with a go-devil, no way they are moving! As a matter of fact, we had a heck of a time getting the poles pulled up after the season ended. They are far enough away from the trails so there is no danger of actors or customers being burned. Our torches are extinguished and allowed to cool, then capped off every night. Also, there are no trees in the areas of the fires that could be burned. The tours are guided as well, so no one strays from the paths. We obtain all the necessary permits and are very careful with the fires we use. Our volunteer fire department is notified in advance of our event as well, and they are about 2 miles from our property. So as you can see, we are well equip to handle the fires we use and fire safety is not a concern for us.
These "woods" are not the typical dense over grown woods you would think of in a movie. When we bought and cleared the property, we cut down all the dead trees. We cleared all the over growth and weeds as well. So, it is a rather thinned down version of the woods. We allowed certain sections of the woods to "grow up" to look more natural for our woods last year. This year we will probably plant corn as our "over growth" for the actors to play in.

* ACTORS- Last year, we had a crew of about 20 actors. However, with more experience, more time to prepare, and better props this year I am hoping to cut that back a bit. I think we can make do with around 18.

* CARPENTRY SKILLS- My dad is a carpenter by trade. He has built everything from houses to coffee tables, and he is good at what he does. He has every tool imaginable. I restore antique furniture, so I am pretty artistic. I can paint, stain, etc. & use any power tool well. My carpentry skills cannot match my fathers, but I am pretty handy. My brother in law is a certified electrician. He does our electric work. Between the three of us we can build anything.

* POWER AVAILABILITY- We have a standard light pole to pull all our power from, so we have a lot available. If that is not enough we have 2 very large gas generators that we can use. We did use them last year, only because we didn't have enough money left to buy more wiring we needed. But, I am hoping to cut them out this year. They are too loud.

* BUDGET- This is the one area that we are not well equip in LOL. After all the costs involved last year, we went in the hole big time. I figure that advertising will eat up a huge chunk of our budget. I want to do some radio advertising on at least one local station, two if possible. I am hoping to keep our advertising under $1,000. Since we already have many of the more costly supplies we will need on hand, like loads of lumber, ( we have hoarded it from houses and barns that were torn down to use in the woods LOL) I think we can defiantly get away with a budget of around $800.00. I bought a lot of things we will need in bulk during the clearance sales after Halloween. Things you use a lot of, like spider webs, fake blood ( I like the quarts of blood they sell at wal-mart because the blood is not sticky and does not attract insects), and a lot of masks and costumes. I bought about a dozen or so skulls and other props to use just as fillers for scenes. Even if we don't use some of the costumes, props, and masks this year, they will be used eventually, depending on the themes we use. I also made a lot of my props that looked great. Things like intestines, bloodied up manikin heads, and the headstones in our cemetery scene. We used some great pieces from my antique items like an old trunk and a huge rusty old vice. We have tons of yard sales here, a huge scrap metal yard where we can get metal supplies for cheap, and we can make a lot of our stuff. That will help us out tremendously with the budget.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You seem to have several scenes that could be easily incorporated into a larger narrative. You have a cemetery already in sight, and "extending" it into your haunt has been suggested and is brilliant.

You asked for scenes you could include in your haunted wood. I have some thoughts on that.

Are the woods naturally scary? Why? I think because they are not tamed, they are not "smooth", and nature cares not one whit for us and our big brains. Stuff in the woods will eat us, and we cannot see it coming. It's not arranged for our convenience, and our hyperactive imaginations see all kinds of patterns in the trees and shadows.

I have a story in my mind. I wonder if you will see it too. Will the guests be self led or have a guide? I like the guide, though it is not necessary. With or without a guide, they should be told that whatever happens, keep moving down the trail. A groundskeeper has lived here for years in a small cottage on the trail, and they can go to him if they need help.

Fog is everywhere. Firelight illuminates the way. Our two guides - why are they armed? - lead the way. Or maybe they just tell us the way. Cowards.

1. Eyes.
I have a few thoughts about eyes. First, eyes watching you are generally creepy. You can make eyes that seem to follow the guests pretty easily and cheaply. Here's a LINK.
We see a set here and there at random along the trail, in bushes and even up in the trees.

Then a kind of "dot room" - maybe an actual room, but even better if it's an enclosure of woven sticks and vines. Of course, the dots would be eyes. They don't even have to be hollow face eyes - just glowing stickers with pupils. Be sure to vary the pupil types. Anyway, like any other dot room, an actor is camouflaged in the scene, and scares them.
Blinking glowing eyes like THESE watch at various points along the trail.
I saw a huge board once that had a thousand nails in it. On each hung a small reflective circle. The overall effect suggested water as stray winds made them move and reflect the light differently. Could something like that, on a smaller scale, make convincing eyes here and there? Maybe nailed to trees, or boards on trees, in pairs?

2. Off the trail over there is a ghost. We know it's a ghost because although it looks like a woman, we can see straight through her. Chicken Wire Ghost
Basically, it's a human figure made of chicken wire so you can see through it. My thought it it could be painted in glow in the dark paint and illuminated with a blacklight. That would be cool. If you light the rest of the scene with a red flood light, it will be clear that they are seeing through the figure. A strategically placed limb or something in front of the red light could cast a shadow on the form, preventing the red and UV from interfering with one another.

3. Axworthy ghost.
a specral shape zips in front of some trees and behind others, in and out of hidden UV LED mini spots. In case you need it, here's a LINK. OK, maybe two.

4. Werewolf. What would a haunted woods be without a werewolf? Or werebear, though I doubt you'd find many who would see enough to know the difference. Check this out - I just was directed to a LINK showing how to make a girl turn into a gorilla before their eyes. How easy to make it a woman into a werewolf? Maybe in her human form, she tells how 20 years ago tonight she lost her little girl to the horror of the woods? Maybe they were picnicking not far from here. Her husband had gone back to the car for a surprise. A beast attacked them and the girl ran into the woods while she - the mother - tried in vain to fight the beast. Where is she? Then she changes into a beast. The werewolf "Attacks"! How cool would it be if the werewolf was a played by a man much larger than the woman? Wearing strips of fabric like the woman had on, of course. How cool if she was one of two guides? Assuming they were there to begin with. Cowards. With the wolf behind, the only thing to do is move forward.

5. Birds. Dollar store crows can be painted different shades to create many different birds. Do they move? Depends on your budget. Sound effects, my friend.

6. FCG - Another old standby that I think would be even better in the woods. Here's one LINK, in case you are unfamiliar. So, why not expand the basic plan to make it a giant spider? Spiders live in the woods. A nest of spiders would be a creepy think to walk into on a trail. Sure, you can have a bunch of web and fakes spiders of all kinds, but a giant spider bobbing up and down and moving its legs individually? Yeah. A "Spider victim" prop is a classic. Can we just make out that the victim is dressed like the guides?

7. Levitating girl. If you have an actor who is willing to stand on a platform secured to a tree, you can make her levitate there. Just dress her in a white dress - except her white stockings and shoes are stuffed with pool noodles and are in front of her real legs - which are all in flat black. She should be clearly off the ground, and the white legs should extend below the platform. Everything should be flat black but the parts you want to appear to be part of her. UV helps here. She can bob a bit to help the illusion, and ask for help. She is lost and scared, and wants to find her mommy and daddy. they are lost, too.

A peppers Ghost could be used instead of an actor, though to really sell it, it needs to be triggered only when the guests get to the scene.

In my mind, she's dressed in an overly frilly dress, inappropriate for the woods. One half of her face is torn, as if by claws. She would turn that part away from the guests at first. Then she would turn to face them. I imagine her eyes getting wide, looking behind the guests, and she says "Mommy?" Then the werewolf roars and charges again! Unfortunately, the other guide never had a chance to draw a weapon before being killed. Find the groundskeeper! Assuming the guides came this far. Cowards.

8. Trees. Nothing scary about trees, right? They are everywhere, and pretty much succumb to whatever we wish to do to them. Not walking trees! Standing there, minding their own business until a bunch of guests stumble upon them unaware. Then they move, making horrific noises and bringing the woods to life! Of course, you could do other haunted trees throughout the haunt. I personally would save it for later though. THIS is what I would do earlier.

9. The grounds keeper. The cottage is not exactly what we expect. More of a shack - or even a shanty. skins nailed to the walls. Is that one human? Stains on the ground. An axe - not in a stump, but in the wall. claw marks on the rotting boards. The door bursts open, and there he is, chainsaw roaring! "Where is she!?!?!" he screams "Tell me!!!" Whoa. Let's get out of here!

10. Almost done. There are the lights marking the exit. A roar from the left. It's the werewolf, attacking! A roar from the right - it's a chainsaw! Run! Only as we flee do we realize the wolf and groundskeeper are battling each other. They crash into the dark, and all goes silent.

Time to go home.

I know there are all kinds of ideas out there for lighting and sound effects and whatnot. I refer you to Revenant and his Theater of the Mind segment on HauntCast, where he recommended a soundtrack that would allow even the blind to know what is happening in each scene.

None of these ideas are original to me, but I hope in presenting them here I have helped in some way.
WOW, YOU JUST SENT ME INTO SENSORY OVERLOAD!!!!!!!!!! I love the chicken wire ghost idea!! AWESOME!!! Also loving the idea of a ghostly shape darting in and out of the trees! I will be up late looking at these links now LOL. Great ideas, thanks for sharing!! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have not tried it but I saw it online. A small pit built into your path about 2 feet deep and covered with plexiglass make your TOT walk over it. Now all you do is add snakes, big spiders, raccoons, kittens, anything scary. Real or fake would work, leave air holes for live critters. Make it overly tuff with 4"x4" frame.
Good Luck
Hmmm, liking that....going to give that one some thought! Thanks for sharing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Personally, I think the woods at night at Halloween is scary enough. Use that as a starting point; I'd have strange and horrible creatures following guests around at points through out the trail, along with maybe having non-actors (ticket takers, etc) wear skull-makeup and white hooded robes with spooky runes painted on them in blood (gives it that "Satanic" feeling). The scenes on the trail don't have to be related themeaticaly, but I think a story line helps. Scenes I think would work well include Ed Gein-style cannibal house (avoid the cliche of chainsaws), graverobbery-in-progress, creepy devil-worshipping ceremony in the woods, witch's pumpkin patch, and long abandoned cemetery. Hope this helps. Just one more thing: you'll need a good, strong name for your haunt. Best of luck!
**The name of the location is better than any name we could have picked. It is " THE HAUNTED WOODS ON CEMETERY LANE". Yes, it is actually located on Cemetery lane, that is the real street name. 134 Cemetery lane in the address LOL.**
 
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