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Hey I like that idea. That is another idea that I am going to steal (ahem - I mean borrow) from you. Can you still turn them left and right? Also the screw that attaches the tube to the hanger is it a sheet metal screw or a nut and bolt? As you have said before it is great to see the free flow of ideas from a single theme project on this forum! :D
 

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Joisey, First off I hope your feeling better... we missed you. My solution for connecting all of the lights is to use those "Malibu type connectors" used for landscape lighting. They are also called "Vampire connectors" because they pierce the 12 guage landscape wire with 2 little metal teeth to make a very reliable yet temporary/movable connection. My whole Idea was to create a very flexible design to adapt and evolve with my haunt. So in a nutshell.... Set up your haunt. Buy 100' (or more) of 12 gage landscape lighting wire. Set your fixtures where you think you want them... run the landscape lighting wire to each LED fixture, connect your hookups for this season and your done... In My case I'll have several "Main Runs" of wire in different directions towards multiple fixtures. If you looked down at my setup from the air it would look like a multi-spoked wheel with the power supply being in the center, and the spokes being the "Main runs"of landscape wire All of my fixtures will be attached to the various "Main runs". Of course they aren't straight like spokes. Each run can zig-zag around to accomadate your haunt and avoid tripping hazards. Some runs might be 20' and some night be 125'. Now, I know that 12 gage landscape lighting wire isn't the cheapest... but it allows for such flexibility because as a professional landscape lighting installer, this system allows for you to change your setup every year and still use the main run wire for several years before it corrodes. The piercing effect of the connectors does allow for the main wire to corrode over time, but if it's dedicated to halloween and only used for a few weeks a year it should last for a long long time.
To answer your other question, My pictures represent a bank of 3 lights... I will probably run 20-30 of these and probably 30 individual spots. so between 90 and 120 individual light fixtures.
Greg can you please bring a sample of the landscape wire and the Malibu connectors to the next meeting as a demonstration? I will not be able to make it to that meeting and since you have them already.
 

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Gobos may be used, in connection with projectors and simpler light sources, to create lighting scenes in a theatrical application. this page will explain and show some examples.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gobo_%28lighting%29

It is like putting a lens over the light with an image that you want to project like a slide projector.
 

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There you go! I knew your landscape expertise would come up with something! Nails wood and a rubber band you can't any more basic then that. You are going to have to show them how to make them at the make & take. Did you have the file the points on those nails? What type are they?
 

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the formula for current is I=V/W (I=current, V=voltage, and W=power or watts). So 12/150=12.5 amps. now each spot light uses 20-25ma (milliamps) so 10 spots will use about 250ma (I am buffering a little for safety) so 100 spots will use about 2.5 to 3 amps. I do not think that I need to take this any further do I? OK one more step. 200 - 250 spot will use about 6.5 to 7 amps. That is about the most I would use with that transformer as a general rule you do not want to push a power supply past half of its capacity. The reason that we use computer supplies is that you can usually find them at curbies or from someone getting rid of an old computer.
 

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Wayne you can cut the plug off and just twist the wires together with wire nuts. Just make sure that it is 12V if the adapter is more you will need a different value resistor. Usually computer power packs are what they say they are. I have a few power packs from monitors and they are 12 volts so you will prob be OK with it.
 

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for $17 dollars though for a few dollars more you can purchase a computer power supply. walk into some of mom and pop computer stores and ask them iff they have any old power supplies that they can sell you - might be cheaper. Just make sure that it can power on without a load attached. some do and some do not. Try to get one with a switch so you do not have cut the wires to make a bypass.
 

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we made them at our make and take. This page will give you the basic design we used 3 leds per cap (soda cap) that fits into a 1 inch thin wall PVC pipe (not the schedule 40 stuff). The holes were drilled into the cap the leds inserted from the rear the leads twisted and then soldered. Test the leds if all light crazy glue the leds in the holes and then cover all the exposed connections in hot glue. Insert into the pipe and then follow Niblique's mounting. If you read through this thread you will have all the info you need to make these.

http://hauntforum.com/showthread.php?t=20601&highlight=led+spot+lights&page=15
 

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I decided to go a different route with my connectors I am going to use RCA jacks and plugs for the power connection I feel t is less of a hassle and will pull out id they get tripped over. Plus I can make all kinds of splitters or extensions that I may need. Off the main line I will have a female jack where I will plug in a box on a length of cable with 6 or eight jacks where the led spots will plug in. I will post some pictures as I develop this.
 

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I figured that if I space the connectors on the line at twice the distance apart as the pigtail on the power distribution box (the box with the 6 or 8 RCA jacks) then I can place led spots anywhere I want. I am mainly concerned with ease of connection and a flexible system. I can also plug a second power distribution box into the first if I need to or even just a pigtail with one or two jacks for that odd placement of spots.
 

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The RCA jacks worked great I will get some pictures up as soon as I can. I will try to take some pictures tonight. I have made the power distribution nodes (as I like to call them) very flexible where you can daisy chain one to the next to create your own power grid. Each one has a 5 foot cable on it.
 

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Here are the pictures of my RCA power connections.

In this first picture you can see the components. the Power distribution box and the led spots in the background both 2 and 3 spot versions and the PVC pipes are just single 10mm leds I use to fill in here and there. I also have a few battery operated ones leftover from last year but I will convert them all to RCA plugs. On Halloween not 1 minute after I connected the first few spots the wire got caught on my sneaker and the RCA Jack did exactly what it was supposed to do it pulled out without moving the spots



Each of the power boxes had 5 RCA jacks and one plug on a 5 foot cable 3 in the front and one on each side. Each spot has its own RCA plug instead of wiring them together and into one plug, I did this in case I want to swap out a color (two blues and a green for example).







Here you can see the the first box on the left would plug in the main power line where I had female RCA Jack pigtails they could be spliced in or vampire tapped like Greg does. The double spot plugs into the front of this box. the second power box on the right plugs into the side of the first power box using one of the side jacks. the second (right box) has a 3 spot module plus 2 singles plugged into the side jacks.

 

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Greg what tube and caps did you use for the 12 led spots? I can fit 6 in the one inch soda cap but not 12. Did you run 4 groups of three each one with a resistor and connecting them in parallel running off of 12 Volts?
 

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I would try the 100 Ohm resistor (1/4 watt will be fine) you might be over-driving the pink leds with the smaller resistor. The resistors that come with the leds tend to be right on the edge of the low side of the required value. I do not have any pinks I may have to order some and see how they look. Are we going to be ordering more leds in a group buy?
 

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Greg, Running leds in parallel can be done however I do not recommend it. For one it uses more power that way, you need to use a higher value resistor as well as a higher wattage resistor to absorb the voltage that would have been absorbed by the other two leds in a series circuit, and it can generate heat and shorten the life of the leds. See the links below for an explanation. You are better off with 4 groups of three leds in series (or 3 groups for nine leds) or 3 groups of four leds in series each group having its own resistor

http://www.horrorseek.com/home/halloween/wolfstone/Lighting/litlpo_PoweringLEDs.html

http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/components/led.htm
 

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Spider climber this is the basic circuit that we used (we used 3 leds instead of four but the circuit is the same)



Here is the thread with a more information from the make and take it is a long thread but there a lot of good information in there:

http://hauntforum.com/showthread.php?t=20601

Here is a link to my photobucket album with more pictures

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v147/jmalt31/Halloween Props 3/#!cpZZ1QQtppZZ20

Here is a website about learning electronics if you read the sections on resistors and leds you will understand better.

http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/index.htm

Some tips that we found make construction easier:

Never hook a led to a power source without a resistor (you will burn it out)

Resistors do not have a polarity they can be used either way.

The leds are inserted from the back of the cap, soldered, tested and then glued in with crazy glue. After clipping the extra lead length short we sometimes coat them in hot glue to seal them. (if you have a drain hole in bottom rear your pipe this is not really needed).

In the rear cap (the cap at the bottom) of the pipe I drill a hole above the middle so that it does not hit the bolt that is holding the pipe to the ceiling wire bolt. Place the bolt through the cap so that is does not get pushed down into the pipe while you drill this hole.

The bolt that holds the pipe is drilled through the pipe and the rear cap.

Before you solder the wires to the completed led cap run the wire into the back of the pipe through the upper hole and I tie a small not in the wire so that when it is pulled back into the pipe the stripped ends of the wire are about 1/4 inch from the front end of the pipe.

Leds can only work one way (the longer lead the anode is the positive) - see the picture above.

If you hook a led up backwards you will not hurt the led it will just not light

The resistor can go on either end of the soldered led string (3 leds) the negative (cathode) end or the positive (anode) end.

when soldering the resistors to the led leads bend the leads of both into a small hook or loop and hook together before soldering (makes it so much easier) same thing when you are soldering the wires to the leads

When solder leds to other leds twist the leads together once or twice (not to tight).

If you have any oth4er questions please ask away. If you still need the how to I will try to put one together for you. We will be making these with 9 leds instead of three (3 groups of three with the resistor). The resistor value depends on the color of the leds and their specs.
 
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