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Hillbilly Wrangler
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Okay i have the fog machines, now im onto the chiller. This is the plan i intend to follow http://www.gotfog.com/fog_machine_chiller2.html any comments or suggestions on this? Also have you used primer on your coolers before? Or what about the krylon plastics paint to cover the cooler. I know most paints dont stick to the plastic very well so i was just wondering what you all use to cover it. I am planning on making 2 of them to cover a yard about 18X50 give or take a foot. Is this too much? I want to make sure that i have enough fog so it looks creepy NOT on fire. I planned on using the dryer tube to go out and around through the cemetary and add frozen water bottles along the tube to keep it cool. I was thinking like 6-8 feet out into it from both sides. Let me know what ya think...THANKS
 

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That's a loaded question! ; ) Give yourself 2 hours and start reading our Vortex Chiller Manual thread:
http://www.hauntforum.com/showthread.php?t=3577

There's a bunch of dead links in that thread and a lot of discussion on trying to tweak a couple basic designs. But they do in fact work. There's a lot of discussion of testing on inlets, outlets and attachments. Bottom line is that the DIY chillers that work are the A) Vortex Igloo Ice Cube Chiller 48qt or 60qt size of which Wal-Mart has in stock right now in season. See the Vortex thread and my Photobucket links below in the last paragraph. It can also be made out of things the size of kitty litter pails and 5 gallon buckets for smaller indoor areas
B) a larger 120qt Coleman if you happen to have a 1000W or higher or 1300W constant fogger (which you do not) gmacted made one shown here and I believe Zombie-F uses this design and then there's C) Ghosts of Halloween trash can design shown here and D) a modified version of the gotfog.com chiller you're looking at in the link in your post. Otaku explains his mod on page 54 of the monster Vortex Chiller Manual link I posted above and there's the E) a trash can style Vortex design (not to be confused with the Ghosts of Halloween trash can design) this one shown
acts like a large cooler and uses no dryer ductwork. F) Not part of the Vortex thread but here's a "$20 chiller."

The thing about that Vortex Manual thread is a lot of us intentionally experimented to see how we could get our intended effects for the outdoor or indoor, large or small foggers, large or small areas, windy or not and shared ideas and results. ie. I encourage you to experiment yourself. I had two 400W Gemmy foggers which shut off a lot. I used my Vortex Igloo Cube to make a fogging cauldron while I used my trash can chiller with a Hefty bag on the outlet for graveyard fog successfully. Note for creeping, lower-lying fog, use a Hefty trash bag on the chiller outlet. Experiment with the size you cut it down to.

Note that anything corrugated like a dryer duct will create a wavy effect to the fog. Packing a tube with frozen water bottles is not necessary and will in fact slow down the fog output.

I successfully used Krylon Fusion Camo Ultra Flat Black (no need for primer) in Wal-Mart's paint section.

I personally don't have diagrams or printed instructions for my chillers because I liked the free-form experimentation aspect of figuring out how to make them work, but for my part, I posted photos on Photobucket with descriptions a long time ago. A 48qt Vortex Igloo Ice Cube Chiller Fog Chiller Construction pictures by bpesti - Photobucket. Fog Chiller Tests pictures by bpesti - Photobucket (which I included in response to your Fog and Strobe thread). My trash can chiller I used successfully last Halloween on Trash Can Chiller Construction pictures by bpesti - Photobucket (note the Hefty trash bag was cut smaller than what you see in the photos) and Trash Can Chiller Tests pictures by bpesti - Photobucket.
 

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Hillbilly Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #3
HOLY CRAP....WOW!!!! THANKS. That was soo helpful. I appreciate the time and effort. Ilook forward to finishing this one.
 

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It's the one prop I'm confident sharing info on ; ) Have fun and knock yourself out. And to answer your other question above, yes with the two 700W foggers you have, two chillers will work fine for that 18x50 size yard. Fog will linger because it's chilled but can also go up in the air more up around head-level if you don't use the trash bag on the outlet. Using the trash bag on the outlet slows down the velocity. It won't cover as large of an area but it will cause the chilled fog to lay lower around you ankles or as high as your knees. This is from my first-hand Halloween observation. A ToT accidentally stepped on the bag and it came off the outlet of my trash can chiller. So I saw the difference using a bag on the outlet and not using one. But then again your mileage may vary depending on how much ice you use to chill the fog (it will linger more the more ice you use) and putting a bag on and taking one off is extremely easy to experiment with. Here's airscape's
of his 1200W fogger and 60qt Igloo with a trash bag on the outlet. And another
.

One last note: If you use a cooler design where the fog comes in contact with the ice inside of the chiller then it's a better idea to make and stock-up on home-made refrigerator ice cubes. They don't stick together nearly as much as the store-bought ice cubes in bags. You may also have to take a hammer and break up the ice inside the chiller in the middle of a yard haunt because the ice will eventually stick together no matter what from the fog hitting it. Now if you use a Ghosts of Haloween trash can design, then the type of ice you use doesn't matter because the fog never comes in direct contact with it. The ice in that case is used to chill the outside of the aluminum drier duct which in turn chills the fog as it travels inside 18-plus feet of the drier duct inside the trash can (sort of like intestines ; ).

Note: I looked up my bookmarks to add some additional links to my previous post. It's off-season so you probably won't get many other responses. But that about sums up the proven-successful DIY fog chillers. Have fun!
 

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Hillbilly Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #5
Cool thanks. That really helped clear up my questions. Im definately gunna use the bag theory
 

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FrightZone did an excelllent job summarizing the Vortex chiller and it's variations.

Here is a link to a video of my fog chiller in action. Please note that this is an outside video as most videos you find are inside videos.

I also had great success with it on Halloween, but had to take down the video do to web space constraints.

I used a variation of the chiller last year, but did care for the results much. I am planning on going back to my original design this year as I feel it produces the best results.
 

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Uh-oh... just when you thought it was safe to go back to the forum... is that the Evil Spawn of the Vortex Manual thread looming up out of the fog...? :voorhees:
 

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basically an old cooler with 2 chambers made with cardboard and duct tape one chamber is 2/3 of the cooler that holds the water bottles.The other chamber has room for the fog to coolect before exiting via the computer fan. Input is from the top The chamber seperator is semi sheild shape so fog can move from the top and bottom. Not sure how it works compared to others but it held its own at the Great Lakes Fright Fest Fog Off 2 years in a row.
 

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Ghost Maker
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Uh-oh... just when you thought it was safe to go back to the forum... is that the Evil Spawn of the Vortex Manual thread looming up out of the fog...? :voorhees:
LOL, well speaking for myself I enjoy threads like that as long as they don't get personal. I am always trying to learn new, better, and especially cheaper ways to do things. I tried frozen water bottles in a vinyl carpet tube last year, and it was free and worked okay, but I would like something better this year.
 

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Has anyone thought about making blocks of ice out of 1/2 gallon milk/juice containers (discarding the cardboard) and using those as a channel for the fog?

Additionally, if one fills up a tube, like in the $20 model, should one ony fill it up half way?

What I'm trying to get at is which is more important: making sure that the fog will get chilled or making sure that the fog has clear passage.
 

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Instead of filling the cooler with ice I used two milk jugs that I had filled with water and froze. I wasn't using a very high output fogger, but it seemed to do the trick. The main advantages are that you don't have water from melting ice leaking all over the place, and it's cheaper. I also used a cheap Styrofoam cooler instead of a real plastic one.

charlie
 

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Uh-oh... just when you thought it was safe to go back to the forum... is that the Evil Spawn of the Vortex Manual thread looming up out of the fog...?
That's why I told her it was a loaded question LOL! Many qualified variations in search for the perfect low-lying or at the very least, dense, slow, lingering fog ; )

I think we're on the right track. I like the ideas of freezing different plastic containers and using that inside of a chiller instead of melting ice cubes. I would try those if I get the chance. Why not. I had previously tried frozen water bottles laid cap-to-cap in a 8ft aluminum 3" dia drier duct using a 400W Gemmy fogger. It worked but not nearly as well as the Fog Expanding Vortex-inspired Igloo Cube or the Ghosts of Halloween Trash Can IMHO. But like I said your mileage may vary.

I happened to want to play around with the Igloo Cube once I discovered it in the store off-season last year because the overall shape reminded me of the Vortex Fusion shown here. Yes it took time, money and materials and figuring and refiguring testing and experimenting endlessly and sometimes needlessly but it was fun to do. There's nothing wrong with trying to perfect a $20 chiller either. I'm fascinated with how many variations people come up with. But the ones I listed on the first page are proven to work either thru video, photos, more than one person reporting success, logic or the honor system of reporting how well each one worked. Of course people live in different areas of the country and the weather and ambient temperature and wind or no wind, outdoors or covered porch, etc are all variables to consider.

So now we have some new ideas here on what to chill the fog with besides ice cubes on this thread. And that's a good thing especially since Turtle mentioned she wanted to try the frozen water bottles up front. The Vortex Manual thread primarily addresses the physics, reverse-engineering, and physical structure of the chillers and attachments and modifications in depth.

That's why I say the Vortex Manual thread went so long because a lot of DIY haunters were experimenting. And for that matter I forgot to mention if you try the Igloo Ice Cube ("cube" meaning the relative shape of the cooler and also a marketing play on words) then you have the option of trying a 1/3 fog expansion chamber at the bottom with a 2/3 ice tray area while filling the ice layer no higher than approx. 1" from the closed lid -OR- you could reverse that proportion and use a 2/3 fog expansion chamber at the bottom and 1/3 ice tray area at the top to within no more than 1" of the closed lid. I found it depends on the fogger as well. A low wattage 400W fogger has a hard time getting thru a thicker level of ice (or bottles I suppose).

I do think a higher wattage fogger gives you more of a chance for fog not to dissipate because I've seen a major league amusement park use over (100 ct) 1400W and a few 4400W LeMaitre stage quality foggers and probably top notch fog juice (NOT chilled though) fill up entire midways during their Halloween events by windy Lake Erie. I'm stuck financially with the 400W foggers for now but will eventually step up to a 700W, 1000W, 1200W or maybe VEI 1300W constant foggers one of these days and maybe a little Froggy's Fog Juice. I think I'd use a larger chiller and more ice based on reports from other haunters.

Here's another example of the "$20" chiller filled with ice cubes. They have a video at the bottom of their Village Haunt page. It works indoors but doesn't cover any serious kind of area. But it depends on the intent.
 

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Has anyone thought about making blocks of ice out of 1/2 gallon milk/juice containers (discarding the cardboard) and using those as a channel for the fog?

Additionally, if one fills up a tube, like in the $20 model, should one ony fill it up half way?

What I'm trying to get at is which is more important: making sure that the fog will get chilled or making sure that the fog has clear passage.
Hmmm, I wonder if you could come up with a way to make ice containers with channels through it something like this

only with more holes. These could be used in the vortex style chiller, maybe giving you the cold surface area you need with the convenience of frozen containers and ice that does not need to get busted apart?
 

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I think everyone has a different opinion on what works and what doesn't work. I think that's what made the Vortex chiller thread so interesting.

I let my video do the talking. I don't think anyone can say that my fogger/fog chiller doesn't produce a high volume of low lying fog. I'm happy with it.
 

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Hillbilly Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #18
Hey anyone tried cooling the fog juice? Also why do i need a space for air at the top? THanks
 

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Hmmm, I wonder if you could come up with a way to make ice containers with channels through it something like this

only with more holes. These could be used in the vortex style chiller, maybe giving you the cold surface area you need with the convenience of frozen containers and ice that does not need to get busted apart?
Last Halloween I used 7 blocks in a wire milk crate and the lasted the entire night (3 bottom, 2 middle with gap, 2 top cross pieces). The ice lasted the entire night. I cannot comment on how well it did. It was an improvement over last year without chilling. Maybe it would do a lot better with 2 sections.

To do what you suggest, I bottom sealed tube of 1 to 2" should be placed in the ice. Once the ice freezes, poor some hot water into the tube to extract it. That would be the best way to make the form. Personnally, I like the idead of using 4 (or 8) blocks and carving out the corners, or maybe bending in a corner length before freezing. (ease, cheap, disposable....)
 

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Hey anyone tried cooling the fog juice? Also why do i need a space for air at the top? THanks
From what I understand, it's the heating of the fog juice that causes a chemical reaction and makes it foggy. I have seen some "make your own" instructions using an old iron.

As for the the the space at the top, I understand it's a vent allowing clean air to come back to the nozzle/allowing cold air to touch the nozzle so it doesn't over heat.
 
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