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I found this Instructables a little while back on making your own homemade version of Sugru. The author calls his version "Oogo".

Sugru is a pliable, waterproof silicone coating that comes in little packages. When mixed, it can be used to create little items, coat surfaces, and more.

However, I am cheap and did not want to pay the price they are offering, so that's where the Instructables comes in.

The idea is to use the Silicone that comes in tubes (available at hardware stores, walmart, etc) to use for molding. However, regular silicone has some set time issues. Straight out of the tube, the silicone that is not exposed to air/moisture will not set for a long time (ever, if thick enough).

However, by mixing in corn starch (and a little paint if you want to color it), you can control the set time. Mixing at a 1:1 ratio, you have a couple minutes of workable time. After a couple more minutes, it becomes claylike. In 10-15 minutes it takes its final form and can be demolded safely. Using less starch will extend the working time. 5:1 cornstarch gives you about 2 hours, according to the article, but I've not tried that myself.

I've used this to cast ears from my model (my daughter). I did an impression with dental alginate of the ear, then packed the mold with the Oogoo and got some good results. I used popsicle sticks to manipulate the Oogoo when it is pliable (it is very stickly), packing it into the alginate.



After 10-20 minutes (I'm conservative about set times), I was able to easily demold the impression. The set Oogoo is very pliable and I would have no issues with using a plaster mold in the future without fear of breakage.



Had a gap in the above image on the edge of the ear. Also on the above picture I had cut the mold for when I tried casting plaster in the alginate. I did another impression of her ear using just the Oogoo and did not need to cut the mold or even need any type of mold release.

This stuff is easily colorable too when mixing it up. The author of the instructable recommended using old-based paints, as water will trigger the set process of the silicone, but I was able to successfully use water-based paint. That being said, when I mixed in the paint, the Oogoo was less pliable initially, I might want to use less corn starch when I color in the future.

You want to use the Silicone I type of silicone. Silicone II is available at stores and apparently it is not the correct time. Not sure of what would happen.

There is a strong smell of Acetic acid that is released by the silicone (vinegar) so you might want to be well ventilated. I did get a headache after doing this in my kitchen and it sting your eyes a bit, but nothing we all haven't had to deal with doing other projects, I'm sure!

I wanted to pass this along to fellow haunters to use and enjoy. I've seen this type of silicone being used to create fake wounds before, and this might make that process easier as well. :jol:

TLDR: Silicone I + Corn starch = quick and cheap silicone casting substitute.
Enjoy!
 

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Very cool! I've actually been playing around with casting in paper mache clay. I have a couple of items I have already cast. Very cheap and very easy to do. Right now I am just using old plastic skulls and masks as a mold for the paper mache clay. I can see using this to make small silicone molds. Nice find! I'll post a video of a few items I have cast in paper mache clay in another thread so as not drag yours off topic.
 

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I love this stuff, Ive been making ears and fingers and such out of it, Indestructables is a great resource if you can sift through the lot the find the gems.
 

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Capt'n Pirate MacGyver
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I've never added any corn starch to my silicone when mixing with paint. I too have had success with latex paints but don't do a 50:50 mix ... more like a 75:25 silicone:paint. Thanks for the info!
 

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I used this technique tonight and it worked great! I did one thing different, though, in that I added naphtha to the silicone first which made it more "liquid" when it was mixed together. I used a ratio of about 4:1 silicone-naphtha. Allen H from StiltBeastStudios used naphtha when making a silicone mask. He was then able to paint it onto his form with a brush.

I then mixed in the corn starch (also at a 4:1 ratio) using a popsicle stick and smoothed out the top. I pressed my form into the mixture and within about 15 minutes or so it had cured enough that I could pull out the form cleanly.

I actually used plaster to cast the form, but intend to follow up with homemade paper clay (blown insulation variety). The plaster seems to take longer to cure in the silicone than it might otherwise but it captured all the details.

Rich
 

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Ghost Maker
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Resurrecting this thread. I have been looking for a way to try and mold arms, heads and torso's for ghost kits, and I think this is worth a try. I have some questions for those of you who have tried this. How large a mold can you make with this? Has anyone ever made a mother mold on one of these? Can it be painted or smoothed on the armature without it all running off?

Thanks!
 

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I am also intersted in knowing how well this worked out. I'd like to find something cheaper than Dragon Skin, with the caulk this requires at $5-6 buck for 10 oz, and the Dragon Skin $30 for two pounds, it would work out to about half the price....if t works and is worth the hassle.

I have been considering giving this a try, already got the stuff, just need the time. I was going to experiment by attempting to use it to mold a normal sized pumpkin. When I give it a go, I will most definitely post my findings!
 

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I tried this and it works great. The mold dries very fast. Another method that I like is to use the silicone straight out of the can. You dip your fingers into a cup of soapy water and then press/spread the silicone around and it won't stick to your fingers. I used the fiberglass resin and fiberglass mat from the automotive dept at Walmart to make a mother mold. My first attempt at filling the mold with great stuff didn't work out since I didn't fill it all the way, but I'm going to de-mold today anyway to see how easily Great Stuff comes out of it. Here is a link to where I learned the soapy water trick...

 

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I am also intersted in knowing how well this worked out. I'd like to find something cheaper than Dragon Skin, with the caulk this requires at $5-6 buck for 10 oz, and the Dragon Skin $30 for two pounds, it would work out to about half the price....if t works and is worth the hassle.

I have been considering giving this a try, already got the stuff, just need the time. I was going to experiment by attempting to use it to mold a normal sized pumpkin. When I give it a go, I will most definitely post my findings!
I was going to mold a pumpkin too. Let us (me) know how it goes, heh

I'd like to be able to go to a store and buy the materials for this instead of order stuff off the net. Also it's probably cheaper too.

I'd love to test it out on a skull I have to make these
 

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The mold worked great for me. I used Great Stuff to cast the skull. The only problem is that the foam deep inside hadn't cured yet and the skull caved in when I removed it. Other than that it worked great. I am going to buy more Great Stuff and try again in a couple days.
 

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The mold worked great for me. I used Great Stuff to cast the skull. The only problem is that the foam deep inside hadn't cured yet and the skull caved in when I removed it. Other than that it worked great. I am going to buy more Great Stuff and try again in a couple days.
Seems like you'd have to drill small vent holes all over the side opposite of the mold opening to vent. Then carefully trim the foam noodles off. Surely you remember trimming off the plastic from injected molded parts lattice for model cars.
 

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In Remembrance
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The mold worked great for me. I used Great Stuff to cast the skull. The only problem is that the foam deep inside hadn't cured yet and the skull caved in when I removed it. Other than that it worked great. I am going to buy more Great Stuff and try again in a couple days.
When GS is to thick the middle can not get the moisture it needs to cure. You might want to try one of these options.
Mist the mold with water before you put the GS in and again half way through.

Place something in the middle of the skull that can be removed as the GS is curing. A small drinking glass with smooth outer surface that has been covered with a release agent (vaseline ect) This will help to prevent the gooie center problem and make a hole that can be used to mount the skull.
 

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Thanks for the tips. I like the idea of added something in the middle. a balloon perhaps? They are very cheap (25 for $1 at Walmart) and can be deflated and removed. I will also try misting it with water. I did make a successful cast with hydrocal, but it's heavy and I intent to use it for a sculpting armature
 

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Cragun-
Please dont apply Oogoo to your skin. Tin cure silicone has industrial solvents in it and will slowly attack your liver. Try to wear gloves when you are using it. Even when cured it still leeches chemicals. Platinum silicone is used for make up, not tin cure (caulking silicone).
Use Gelatin to make a prosthetic instead. I will do a tut video soon, but it is super easy. There are also a few videos out there that are good.
 
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