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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently posted a showroom thread for my Frankenstein prop. Along with that prop, I posted image of a fusebox prop I created. Rather than clutter that thread with a discussion about electric firecrackers and short circuited fuses, I'm adding a thread here.





My fusebox prop is an accessory to a Frankenstein lab theme. You really can't have a monster and lab and not have a switch can you?

I chose to use faulty short circuiting fuses rather than ambient lights for my scene. Basically, I can throw a spot light up with a remote...why bother synchronizing it with a controller? Using the two outlets on the back of my monster controller (see album), I can sequence two hidden lights to flash in sync to a sound effect.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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2,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Each fuse is made using two sizes of pvc pipe. One to fit inside the other to hide the light. There are five pieces of pvc to each fuse. Three pieces to the inside, and two outer pieces painted with a bronze look. The pvc is similar glued together...with wiring feed through the base.



Since my monster controller prop already has 110 outlets for control, I chose c7 Christmas lights for my fuses. I could have done this with leds and a picaxe. Maybe one of the picaxe enthusiasts on here will give it a go?

Each fuse is nothing more than a simulated blue flashlight...firing at whatever timeframe I choose on my controller. This prop idea isn't new, just my method of going about making it. Only two of my fuses are firing. I left the other as a backup.

The base for the fuses and the switch were made from scrap wood. Up close, it really has a nice look. For me, I couldn't even care whether I let the sequence fire off on Halloween.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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2,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A close up view is shown below. If you have a similar fusebox type prop, feel free to post in this thread.

 

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That looks awesome! Where'd you get the throw switch?

I'd like to see your whole thing set up, as I am also doing a mad scientist lab.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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2,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry, I've been slacking and didn't watch the thread.

I was too busy Halloween night to get good night shots. (I only setup my display for one night.). As for action images...I accidentally fried my controller. I have replacement chips but haven't attempted the fix yet.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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2,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Throw switch

That looks awesome! Where'd you get the throw switch?

I'd like to see your whole thing set up, as I am also doing a mad scientist lab.
The throw switch was purchased on eBay. Most of the bidders on switches I've watched come from Haunt forums. As soon as I'd let one go, I'd see a prop comment with pics. Lol.

I intended to mount it on a panel, but decided I had more flexibility in placing it near the controller if it stood alone. Damn thing is heavy too. Btw, you should find sporatic images in my albums.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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2,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Many people have recently ordered e-firecrackers. Due to that fact, I've been asked a few questions about the construction this switch prop.

The fuses are pvc. The base was made with some spare wood. I believe the cross pieces are 2x2. Using two pieces aligned next to each other, I measure the distance and then used a radial saw to put slices into the wood at appropriate equipdistant spacing. This is where the separators will slide in place. The separators are just wood pieces cut from thin board purchased at HD.



Before putting it all together, I used a cylinder sander to sand the two pieces (still side by side to maintain precision. If the sander were laying down (which it doesn't)..the cylinder would create an indention like this...



After the pieces are sanded for each fuse. And the slices are made for each separator...I painted the parts and then pieced it together with just a touch of wood glue on each. The entire assembly was then screwed to the base from behind.



My wires for each fuse run in from the back, via holes I drilled. For this reason, it's helpful to not glue until you are sure everything is properly completed and painted.

For e-firecrackers, I intend to remake this portion with appropriate measuring for the e-crackers. Hopefully this all makes sense to those who asked.
 
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