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Okay, this is an opinion discussion rather than necessarilly a factual one... For animated props, which is better to use- electrical motors or pneumatics ?
 

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it might differ with what you are trying to do.
i'm thinking that electric motors would be used in well convered areas as to not get wet.
also, they would be quieter.
pneumatics could be used indoors or out.
but are loud in most cases...
but those are my thoughts!
i haven't used either of them... so i could be wrong!
:p.
 

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It really does depend on what you are trying to do Sickie, if you're looking for slow, repetative movement, then an electric motor is the weapon of choice. Rapid movement, say with a pop-up type prop, would normally require pneumatics. Both have their place in a haunt, just depends on the prop. My graveyard scene uses them both. The motors provide subtle motion to an otherwise static scene, and the pneumatics provide the unexpected startle. I use the motorized prop to draw the viewer's attention into the scene and then spring what they think is a static prop into motion to scare the crap out of them. No real preference for me, both do the job intended.
 

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I think the best thing for you to do is come up with an idea for a prop you'd like to animate. Once you decide, the forum members could give you their opinion on which would be better to use and why. It's as the others have already mentioned, both are great, but each has it's advantages and disadvantages.

As an example, if you wanted to make one of those kicking leg props, the version that lays on the ground, an electric windshield wiper motor is great for it, but if you wanted to go with the hangman, pneumatics are the choice.
 

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after just finishing my pneumatic prop - im leaning very heavily towards the pneumatics - unless in an instance such as an FCG of sorts - or movement that is so slow that people would not notice repetition - such as dave the deads pumpkin monster perhaps - which is awesome btw - pneumatics are very versotile - i was leaning heavily towards motors for some of my movements because i wanted some really really subtle movements - but after some talking, i decided to go with pneumatics - several reasons - despite what people - myself included - think - they can be used in very slow subtle applications - use a flow valve to controll the amount of air that actually reaches the cylinder - my test video doesn't show it well - but in the program i presented it with - some movements were VERY slow

pneumatics are so much stronger in my opinion for amount of size they take up - my frame and body probably is close to 100 lbs - maybe a bit less - and these cylinders throw him around like hes about 20 lbs - and best of all - minus the valves which are secured on a small shelf underneath the prop - everything is completely enclosed into the body

lastly - i am glad i went with pneumatics because you can program them to whatEVER you want - you could even have them programmed so that it goes along with a story your telling or somehitng like that - unless you have extensive knowledge of relays and different circuits to randomize your movements (which i have seen some very nice motor props) i am skeptical of the realism and actual randomness that can be achieved by a motor

i will admit i havent done much with motors - so this post is obviously one sided - but i hope it may have helped the positive aspect side of pneumatics a bit - riley
 

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Hmmmm air driven FCG - wait, take an air drill.... maybe not. ... I would have to agree with Brad, each one has its place -
Motors
rocking tombstones, FCG, smooth rocking chair, .
May require transformers from 110ac to 12dc
question - would a servo be considered a form of electric motor?
pneumatics
popups, leapers, opening and closing doors, creature crates
Air has overhead which includes a compressor which might limit some. may add unwanted prop noise as well as a compresser noise. For example here is Small Lot SoCalif there is no place I can put a compressor that you wont hear it. Which is my primary reason from staying away from it. This year I am creating an insolated box to see if I can reduce the noise.
 

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I agree with Brad...That's like asking whether you prefer hammers or screwdrivers. Both have thier place in your project.
Unless you have a really big screwdriver!

I would think that for continuous repetitive movement, motors would be the way to go, and for the shock of speed and sudden movement you would go pneumatic. I agree that it's definitely a situational decision.:smoking:
 

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I agree both have thier specialty....When it comes to lifting heavy things pnuematics is much easier to work with, since it doesn't require relays, limit switches and heavy duty motors. Last years project building a clone of xtreme creators creature crate. I used the Haunted Village animation maestro II ( pretty close to the gilderfluke minibrick contoller with only two outputs) . These type of "easy" programmable controllers opened a whole new world for me to control standalone props, and it will contoll more than just pnuematics. You can even trigger these devices with mat switches, PIR sensors and they will playback your routine exactly. I have even triggered this device using VSA and Parallax servo controller in a larger show.

I use the wiper motors for continious slow moving props as stated by previous posters
 

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My primary deciding factor is usually; "How easy is it to achieve the final motion, with a linear prime mover or a rotary one?"
 
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