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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone in the know explain the difference between these various forms of paper mache like "clays". I bought some Celluclay the other day and it's lumpy. I was hoping for something with a nice surface when I am done... I'm sure I'm not the only confused by these products.
 

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Celluclay is good for getting the general shape, but yes it is lumpy. It's supposedly sandable, but I've never tried... After a base of Celluclay, I used DAS clay. I kept a bowl of water handy to wet my fingers so I could get a nice smooth surface. Next up is a layer of paperclay, which is supposed to be good for detail work...

I got all this from Lauriebeast's threads on witch-building (Ophelia and Zelda)...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know by googling that the DAS clay is some sort of air-drying clay. From past experience with the Crayola :eek: air dry clay that cracking is a concern. Does that hold true with the DAS?

Also, why the 2 steps after the celluclay? Can you not go straight to paper clay? I guess I'm asking what is the relative value of the various clays...

Sorry for being so thick headed.
 

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I work mostly with celluclay, and I achieve some pretty fine detail with just that. Occasionally I'll use paper Clay to get ultra fine detail, but for the most part I stick with the celluclay. To get rid of the lumps keep some water handy, and always keep your hands moist so it'll smooth out well. Another trick is to work in layers so you can keep the clay from lumping where you don't want it. Sanding down the celluclay is also a way to smooth out any imperfections, but is time consuming and tiring. I tend to use a palm sander if I'm going to sand large areas. Smaller areas have to be hand worked, but you get better results that way. Hope this helps!!
 

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The terms confuse me, too, so I just looked them up:) Strictly speaking, "paper clay" is clay to which processed cellulose fibers (paper) has been added. It behaves like regular clay, gives a stronger final product than clay without the cellulose fibers, and is usually fired. "Celluclay" is also called "instant papier mache" and is entirely made from paper.

I've used celluclay once and had problems getting anything like a smooth surface. I might just have to try experimenting with the water-to-paper ratio to see if I have better luck with a thinner mix.

Word on air-drying clays is that they are all prone to cracking, which can work to your advantage depending on the prop.
 

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i second Roxy on this one! The air dry clay def cracks. the only way around that problem is to spray paint the clay before it dries.
 

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Roxy, did you make it too dry? I keep it the consistency of regular modeling clay. Firm enough to maintain shape, but wet enough that you can smooth it out. Also, if you use thinner layers, and build it up slowly, you can eliminate the lumps. Just have to be patient with it.
 

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Yep, entirely possible, Jack. I kept adding water but I remember it being hard to work with. It didn't look bad, just not smooth.
 
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