Haunt Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Humanitarian of the Year
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you are the type that likes to plan before you build, this is for you. Using Google Sketchup is a great way to plan your haunts and modify haunts later on if you choose with ease. It is also a great way to plan for the amount of material you'll need for any application. If you're in the construction industry, this is similar to the BIM (Building Information Modeling) concept. Model the building first, detect conflicts within systems then build per the BIM plans... The front end planning pays off in the back end work of a project.

Below is a simple example of an entrance I like that I saw online. I saved the image to my computer then imported it into Sketchup. A callout tag points to the program's origin (not shown). It is a standard 3-dimensional X,Y,Z axis origin. The origin is a solid place to start scaling your model.

These steps don't really get into detail how to use sketchup. The in-program tutorials are amazingly easy to follow. The level of detail and accuracy is up to you. This is my methodology how I worked it out in my head as I went along.

Steps:
  • I decided that I want the entry gate to be around 14' tall. I dimensioned it from AFF (above finish floor [aka the ground]) to TOL (top of light).
  • Selecting the tape measure tool, I clicked the origin then ran the cursor down the Z-axis 14' and clicked. This drops a reference mark.
  • The plus sign is the 14' reference mark that I'll use to roughly scale the imported picture to.
  • I imported the picture, set the bottom of the columns in the picture on the X-axis then scaled the picture where the top of light was approximately at 14' (at the same plane of the reference mark).
  • Once that is done, I traced different components of the entry. I did the columns, ornamental iron and gate as separate parts.
  • Once the image is traced 2-dimensional, there is a tool called push/pull. I used this tool to pull the "shapes" up on the Y-axis which magically transforms the 2D shapes into a 3D model.
  • I traced each piece, grouped pieces together, assembled them and created a 3-dimensional, scaled model of an entry that I can build now.
Why is the light a different color? There is a nice web database called Sketchup Warehouse (google it) that people upload models to if they choose. I downloaded a light that closely resembled the one in the picture since I did not want to spend the time creating it. The light object is strictly for reference.

As you can see, the entry model is close enough to the scaled picture. The dimension of the 3D object shows a height of approx. 14'-6" tall - AFF to TOL.

So there you have it... a 2-dimensional picture brought to life in 3D that can assist in the building process. Hopefully this helps you in planning your haunt.

 

·
Clean "cut"
Joined
·
27,007 Posts
Wow, that should be a good site for builders.
 

·
Humanitarian of the Year
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Further demonstration

Further demonstrating the capability of modeling a haunt build. Example fencing build at yard perimeter.

I added:
  • More detail to columns and modified a fence I downloaded from Sketchup Warehouse to replace hand traced one.
  • Applied textures to give it that aesthetically pleasing look.
  • A 6'-0" man for scale reference.
  • Dimensions to demonstrate the ease of material takeoff. Ex: Fence panel length in model = approx 40'-0" LF. The fence I want to build has 3 rails (top, middle and bottom). If i want to build the fence rails with 1x2s, I need 40' x 3 rails = 120 LF of rails. Off to Home Cheapo for 1x2s.
3D isometric view


Front Elevation view
 

·
Humanitarian of the Year
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Example Application

Very nice. I have Sketchup, just never have enough time to sit down and work with it. After seeing what you came up with, I think I may have to make the time.
Sketchup is exceedingly simple. Plus, like I said, the tutorials in the program and on the net make it a breeze. The most work involved is all the measuring if you choose to incorporate your house in the model. Depends how far down the rabbit hole you want to go... Neo. lol

One more example of application and I'm done. Pretend you've measured your entire house, yard and anything else you feel is important then modeled it. Build the haunt around your yard and/or house like this. I'm done, happy modeling!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
This is up my alley. I usually have sketches all over the place with approximate size measurements and estimated material costs. This is a much cleaner presentation. Meanwhile, the fence you're modeling out is going to be a monster! So imposing. I love it.
 

·
Humanitarian of the Year
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I tried to use Sketchup a couple times...
I must have missed something conceptually as I couldn't created the most basic shapes...
I really wanted to be successful but I just couldn't figure it out...
How so? You mean shapes like this?

Views play an important role in modeling also - keep in mind.

BLUE LINE = Y-axis
RED LINE = X-axis
GREEN LINE = Z-axis

=CREATING A SIMPLE RECTANGULAR COLUMN=
TOP VIEW
Rectangle tool to draw a square.


Square completed.


ISOMETRIC VIEW
If your mouse has a scroll wheel, press it and orbit around the object from top view.


Push/Pull tool (icon not shown) selected and hovering over the face of the square. The push/pull tool is 10 icons from the left on the bar underneath the "File" bar (top of screen).


Clicked the push/pull tool and "pulled" the face of the square up the Y-axis to create a column.
 

·
Humanitarian of the Year
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
=MAKING THE COLUMN A GROUP=
Turning objects into groups is a must in order to move the ojects around the space easily. You can group other groups (sub-groups) as well. The gate entrance above consists of 1 group and 4 sub-groups. The sub-groups are: 1.) columns 2.) decorative metal arch 3.) the gate itself 4.) the light. These 4 sub-groups are grouped together as one big group.

Select the entire column you just drew. The lines and faces will be highlighted in thick blue lines and blue polka dotted faces, respectively. Right click then select MAKE GROUP


Column grouped...
 

·
Slowly Losing My Mind
Joined
·
2,820 Posts
That's cool LM!
Didn't know that program existed. It looks similiar to AutoCAD but free!!!!! I will check it out. Thanks!
 

·
Humanitarian of the Year
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That's cool LM!
Didn't know that program existed. It looks similiar to AutoCAD but free!!!!! I will check it out. Thanks!
Hehe, not nearly as complex as CAD but close enough for letting your imagination run free. Look up tutorials on youtube also!!

I love Sketchup, It's been instrumental in many of my projects.
Would you willing to post a picture or two of your concept vs. real life builds from sketchup?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Indeed...
I was able to create a rod/tube and other straight sided shapes with 90 degree angles... Like cubes.
I wanted to draw an obelisk... Perhaps too trickey without a tutor...:)
I actually managed a pyramid but I couldn't lop off top and put a second one with a different angle of slope on top....
I think once my laptop is back in order I'll try it again.
This would be a great topic for a broadcasted hangout...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Awesome work - Was aware of the program, tried it but tried to use it too much like Visio I think and never went any further with it. You have given the idea new light! Thanks
 

·
Humanitarian of the Year
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
@Palmdale: Simply done by (referencing example above in edit group mode) draw an X across the top of the column with the line tool then pull the line intersection up the Y axis :). There is your obelisk top. Then while in edit group mode, can taper it toward the column pyramid connection by using the move tool on each line at the top on each side. Keep consistency by manually inputting the dimension moved after you clicked each line. There is a dimension field in the lower left part of the screen. If you click a line, move it in the direction you want to move the line then type in, let's say 1" then hit enter. The line will move 1" from the original point. Same with -1". It would move the opposite direction. You really just have to dive in, draw a few shapes then mess around with the tools to see what everything does. At least that's how I am... Manual aside, start using! Lol.

@mkozik1: thanks! Show us some applications if you model then build
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top