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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I want to add movement to my arduino controlled skeleton head. I already have a servo mounted in the jaw to move the jaw and that works really well, but after seeing how much cooler everyone's skulls look when then can move around makes me want to add that functionality to mine.

I just don't know the power of servo's or how to machine metal parts. I am much more fluent in wood parts so I was thinking of using wood dowels to create a system like this.

I would use two servos and the skull would mount to the top servo. Does anyone see a reason why this system wouldn't work? I'd hate to spend the time building this just to have the servo's not be able to work in this type of configuration.
 

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it's risky-that bottom servo would take quite a beating, or so it seems. Servos are powerful but that bottom one might not last you long. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was thinking that I could add some springs on each side of the top piece of wood to help the bottom servo from having to hold up all the weight all the time. Sort of like how a garage door opener is helped by a spring...
 

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What about this? Find the center-most balance point of a skull. Think about your bottom servo being at that point..with nothing higher. This would make the skull lift its head up and down. The servo would sustain that tilting weight easily. To make the 360 horizonal spin, the mechanism would sit on a small lazysusan. The lazy susan would bare the entire weight, yet the other servo could easily move it.
 

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You could always make a single servo plate out of wood, the same as used by most 3-axis skulls built by others. Just take a look on Youtube for some of the 3-axis skull tutorials. The design is based on a helicopter swash plate where the servos are fixed and act on a central point (spherical rod end, tie rod end, heim joint...) but at 90 degree separations to minimize interactions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was actually doing that right now! now that I see those and how those work, I could easily do that with a wood plate and other items I'm used to picking up at home depot. I had to read 52 pages into the giant thread on the "other" forum on 3 axis skulls before it finally became clear just how that mechanism works. I'm so glad I asked you guys before I burned out two servos doing it the way I was planning to! Thanks guys!
 

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Glad to help. I've made plates out of aluminum and steel instead of the original plexiglass as well, it all works the same way.
 

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A metal caster is a good option (thanks Dave Corr) - give turn and nod on a nice smooth easily adaptable base.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I can barely make out the mechanism in the picture on his website but it looks much different than the rod mechanism that the others are talking about. It doesn't look like it would be as easy to conceal as the rod method but looks sturdier for masked heads than the rod method maybe?
 

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I can barely make out the mechanism in the picture on his website but it looks much different than the rod mechanism that the others are talking about. It doesn't look like it would be as easy to conceal as the rod method but looks sturdier for masked heads than the rod method maybe?
I use the caster method on my butler which uses a mask. I'm using the standard 3 axis design for the props that use a skull.
I have a video of the working of the mechanism -
[URL="
 

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Nice job mate. Dave Corr certainly has helped the haunter community!
 
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