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Hillbilly Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #1
Okay out there. I would like to make my own skulls. I know lots of you have made your own, could you send me a how to or direct me to one. Ive seen posts on here about it, but cant find them. I would like to be able to use it over and over. Im not sure what the best type of mold to make is. Or what hte best type of stuff to use in it is. I am currently making a paper mache skeleton. I would like it to be similar at least. I cant figure out how to mache over the bucky skull i have and then get if off. Any help would be greatly appreciated. THANKS
 

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A little bit bent...
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I'm using a SkillCraft skull for making mache skulls as we speak. I wrap the model with foil and tape it where needed. Layer the mache on the skull (use lots of layers) and dry completely. Slit the mache up the back of the skull and remove it from back to front. You'll get a little distortion during the removal but nothing bad. Use more mache to seal up the slit, add surface details and you're done. I find that it's easier to remove the jaw and do it separately. This allows you to mount the jaw in different positions. Here's some pics of a half-skull with simple cuts to make teeth, and a full skull and jaw on a groundbreaker with hot glue teeth.

http://halloweengallery.com/displayimage.php?pos=-3704
http://halloweengallery.com/displayimage.php?pos=-3705
 

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Another tip, stole--eh, borrowed--from the Propbuilder's Casting handbook,concerning RTV rubbers like silicone: If you have leftover rubber, like overflow or those drip puddles that DS mentioned in the how-to, let them cure and don't throw them away. If you have access to a meat grinder (and you may be able to get one secondhand at a flea market or thrift store cheap), chop the old rubber up into small pieces and grind it a couple of times until it's about the consistency of birdseed or coarse-grind coffee and save it (obviously, it needs to be a grinder with a sharp grate that actually cuts & grates the material as it exits, not one of those that just pushes stuff through blunt holes).

When you make your next mold, do your initial "impression" coat as normal like DS described it, but in your next coats, mix the ground rubber into the liquid first. It all cures solid, the mold's just as strong; you can get by using less fresh rubber that way (which is good 'cuz that stuff's pricey), and also build thicker coats faster. Waste not want not.
 

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Actually Propbuilders "borrowed" that tip from the Thurston James "Molding and Casting Handbook", an excellent reference book to have.
 

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That's the book I was talking about. "The Prop Builders's Molding and Casting Handbook", by Thurston James, author of the Theater Props Handbook. One of the bibles of prop building.

I see you're an avid reader of Fine Literature too! Just can't beat The Classics.
 

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Another tip, stole--eh, borrowed--from the Propbuilder's Casting handbook,concerning RTV rubbers like silicone: If you have leftover rubber, like overflow or those drip puddles that DS mentioned in the how-to, let them cure and don't throw them away. If you have access to a meat grinder (and you may be able to get one secondhand at a flea market or thrift store cheap), chop the old rubber up into small pieces and grind it a couple of times until it's about the consistency of birdseed or coarse-grind coffee and save it (obviously, it needs to be a grinder with a sharp grate that actually cuts & grates the material as it exits, not one of those that just pushes stuff through blunt holes).

When you make your next mold, do your initial "impression" coat as normal like DS described it, but in your next coats, mix the ground rubber into the liquid first. It all cures solid, the mold's just as strong; you can get by using less fresh rubber that way (which is good 'cuz that stuff's pricey), and also build thicker coats faster. Waste not want not.
Chopping up used silicone and adding it to a new batch of silicone is commonly called 'chumming'.
It's a way to use up old silicone and save money.
IMO, I don't recommend it for Dragon Skin because it can cause curing problems and reduce the strength of your mold.
But I am sure there are other silicone applications that chumming is very good for. :) and I agree, where applicable waste not want not. :)
 

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Chopping up used silicone and adding it to a new batch of silicone is commonly called 'chumming'.
It's a way to use up old silicone and save money.
IMO, I don't recommend it for Dragon Skin because it can cause curing problems and reduce the strength of your mold.
Besides, chumming attracts sharks.

It doesn't work with DragonSkin? How come? I've used "regular" A/B silicones and it worked great. Does DragonSkin have some other additives or something in it? I'll admit total ignorance here, I've never even heard of it until I came here. :eek:
 

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Hillbilly Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #11
Okay well i will try one of these, not sure which. I am also doing a MNT this weekend with Dave the Dead and he has a mold. Ill let you guys know how it turned out.
 
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