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I've made furniture/cabnitry.
Ive made stage/holloween props.

Am I the only one who finds the detail/construction techniques of the first category impeedes the building of the later?

Workin on my 13hr clock this weekend I kept having to remind myself that it would be viewed at a distance & didn't need to be built like "Old Ironsides". I cought myself trying to breakout the sander to get the plastic flush with the framing even though I knew it was going to be covered in trim. then there was the temptation to sand & do multiple coats when it should look "weathered".
 

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Everything I do seems to go along that line. And it is always a pity to see the prop, in it's final display spot, with dim light,and not even being able to see that mossy area that I spent hours trying to get just right.
 

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You are not alone. I have been working on a few props trying to get them ready for the big day and now I am startingto realize that I may not finish due to my attention to detail.

However the alternative is to a quick job that during the light of day will look cheesy, but at night will probably look fine. While hopefully when I am done, mine will look fantastic during the day and probably great at night.

A long time ago I did a cheap and quick mummy that to this day bothers me since it looks cheesy to me night or day, but every year it probably gets the best response from the kids. So heck if I know how to know when the prop is acceptable to an audience; I just know when it is acceptable to me. And therein lies the rub.
 

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Yep! Being an Obsessive Perfectionist is a real PIA sometimes, but there is nothing wrong with tight flush fitting joints. I have yet to find anone elses display in my area that didn't scream CHEESE as I pass by.. Keep it as Perfect as you can without wasting to much time, you will be much happier with the outcome and the ooos and ahhhs!
 

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LOL. I too can be a bit obsessive compulsive at times.
I always remind myself, it will be dark, it will be dimly lit. I will be staring at the damn thing for hours, most people wont look at it for more than 15 seconds. That usually seems to calm me down a it from over doing it.
Like painting a ground breaker with more than 3 colors, why would I? When lit with par can all im gonna see is the contrast of dark to light, I paint it different colors so it looks good on my work bench . LOL
 

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My dad always used to say, "The objective is the appearance of perfection, not perfection itself."
Said another way, "Gitterdone"
The Cable Guy
 

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I don't worry about details. If I do, I do details for myself. I have a few 'big' pieces that are detailed, but mostly I just get out a lot of stuff. Quantity over quality. I spend a lot of time with lighting, so that hides my lack of detail.
 

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I'm bringing sexy back
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Everyone of us takes pride when making a prop that we tend to build it and overdo it. It's our hobby. I agree that you can get caught up with too much detail especially when TOTs are trying to get from house to house in record time. However, I find that the teenage TOTs do take more time to look around a little bit more but it's usually around 6:30-8 p.m when it's dark and they're making their way home. It is a tough judgement call.
 

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No kill like overkill! I sweat over the details because that's what I like to do, It's time consuming and annoying as hell at times, but truth is, others may only see it for a minute, but I have to live with it.
 

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I know what you guys mean.
I usually have my stuff fully up for 3 events.

  1. My annual Halloween party.
  2. October 31st TOT's
  3. My halloween Open house for Friends and family the Sunday after Halloween

My wife had to remind me that the last one was the most important one.
Those are the people who will be looking at and appreciating the details.

Some of those people are friends who have haunts of there own and didn't get a chance to swing by and see my work.

On another note I have always had a hard time saying "Good enough for Government work " ;) in anything I do.
 

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yeah i guess i'm the same way i want to get it right the first time and not have to fix it up for the next use.
But you will always look at it even when your done and say i could have...
To me if it looks good in the day ..it 's gonna rock at night.
 

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With two teenagers in the house I do tend to take more time to get it right. . . .the first time. Setting and example and all that. However, with only a week to go, I am pushing a bit.
 

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My attention span is usually not long enough to do too much detail. I start a project and by the time I'm halfway through, I'm sick of it and want to move on to the next one. The neighbors are impressed anyway though.

We actually had a bunch of neighbors mention our new wrought-iron fence this week. They thought it was real.
 

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My attention to detail is usually way overdone, since everything is viewed at night under low lighting.

I live in the city and leave my haunting for my seasonal campsite where our 5th wheel is parked. The campgrounds are large and there are 2 BIG Halloween weekends there, including a haunted hayride that I participate in. Usually there are 700+ on the ride for that one evening and lasts up to 3 hours. Site judging is quite an event too. Almost nonstop visitors from dusk till around 11:00 PM.

Realistically, my big priority should be weatherproofing my props, since it is in the woods and storage is usually in a moist and/or damp area. It's hard not to pay utmost attention to detail...until you're finding out that time is running out all of a sudden.
 

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to me its not how the TOTs see it, its about how i see it
Thats why i try to fix everything thats not perfect or detailed enough in my eyes.
 

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Good topic. It's hard to find a balance between being personally satisfied with your work, and just getting it done to have another prop for the collection. My problem is starting things too darn late, and then finding more things to do and rushing to get them done as well.
I personally love details, even if other's don't see them. I appreciate it when someone takes time to notice the little things, and last Halloween had parents come back after TOT hours (when the kids weren't rushing them) to take pictures and just look at things. It was a nice afterglow standing there explaining how things were done/made.
It is, in a sense, a hobby, so why not pursue it with the same vigor?
 

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I wrangle over the lettering of a sign, I paint a prop for close-up inspection,I shade the edge of a tombstone......
Yeah, you cant see most of the details in the dark but, during the day you can.
My yard is small, so most things are seen close up.I dont feel its wasted effort
The time is well spent for me
 

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I suffer with the attention to detail when I mache. Does the layers of "skin" meld well together? Can anyone see the seams between pieces? Are the wrinkles too much or not enough? Did the paint and stain combination look real enough?
Things usually work out in the end, but I spend weeks trying to get it right...If I could just throw things together, I'd have an army of groundbreakers rather than the 4 I have now.
 

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We are all our own worst critics. But when I am trying to gt the flesh tone just right , or make sure that the blood stains show up in red light....I realize that it may not be that important and then I think....." Its for the children"... and I work to make it the best I can......BUWHOWAHAHA
 
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