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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure this is a dumb question because I think I already know the answer...but I'm asking anyway.

I have a large prop that wasn't created by me. This prop was displayed for several years at a large amusement park. It was made of plywood and coated to look like cement. The texture and look is identical to the look of the wall in this torch photo. It's very durable and appears to be make the plywood quite weather proof. The same type of coating is sometimes used on tombstones. I believe it's store bought...not monster mud.

What is that coating?



For those looking at the torch picture...it's just an image I found on the net. But I plan to make a couple fake silk flame torches like this one....out of pvc, foam, and maybe plastic for the grate at the top. Of course, with ventilation for the flame to work.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's what I'm thinking. But I don't know exactly what DryLok is. Is it like a stucco paint/paste? From one of the other posts, I got the feeling DryLok was clear.
 

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Director of Ambiance
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Drylok is white, and is tintable to any color you want. It is like a paint in how it applies, but expands to fill gaps (which is what it was intended for - waterproofing masonry), can be applied with a brush, and gets its texture from sand mixed into it.
 

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thats what i am thinking it is as well or similar .. Masonry waterproofer ( its basically like a latex mixed with portland cement.)
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thats what i am thinking it is as well or similar .. Masonry waterproofer ( its basically like a latex mixed with portland cement.)
That's a good description. Thx. Now I need to go out and get some.
 

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In Remembrance
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Most paint stores, home depot, lowes, menards should have it in stock. Not sure about the price, $25 to $30 a gallon wouldnt suprise me though.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do you have a larger picture of this prop?
It's not a prop....yet. It is just an image that showed the type of wall texture I was confirming. I am making a couple of torches like it though. I can explain how I'm building them if you want an example.
 

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I think your looking for something else

From what you described it sounds more like a fibered cement product like what a lot of fast food buildings are coated in like jack in the box is fibered cement over foam.
 

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We used "STO" products to achieve the stone look and it is very hard and sturdy. It's the stuff they put on the outside of buildings (hotels,restaurants) to make them appear to be made out of concrete or stone.
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sounds like there are several. I'll investigate a few. Although, I do believe it's DryLok I'm referring to....it looks exactly like the stuff they put on the outside of buildings to make them appear to be constructed from concrete. Do you have an STO link?
 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My first step in building these, is to construct the flame. I want something similar to flaming baskets...but I want a medieval look to it. Apologies to the photo author...I saw it when I googled "ancient torch".

Using the same methods used for making flaming baskets...I've wired LEDs around small fans. The fans I have, were purchased at CVS pharmacy. They were about $10 each, black...and labeled Cool-Breeze 4" high velocity fans. They have an off/on switch...but no speed control.

I've wired two sets of yel/red/yel around the fan. Keeping red in the middle. It's my own personal taste. Add a blue or whatever makes you think fire. My lights are wired to a 9V battery holder. Make sure you use the proper resistors for your LEDs.

 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Next....

Using pvc pipe, I'll build mounting brackets. This will be done on a table, not a wall. I will cut two pipes and several rings from a slightly larger pipe. The rings will be used as shown...to mount the pipes to the base...and to the end of the supports. Keeping a proper diagonal...I'll use another spare piece of pvc to hold these in place. A healthy amount of pvc glue should hold them just fine. If you make more than one...make sure the angles match.

Before making these...look ahead at how the cord will be fed. I intend to feed the cord through the supports. (I'm still not sure whether I'm going to wall mount my torches, or place them on a table.)

 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If the torches are going to mounted on a fake wall, the plug will need to be fed through the supports and out the back of the plywood wall. If the wall is solid and not a haunt wall...it will have to drop down or be fed through another route.

If they will set on a table...a single support will be created. You can feed it down and out...or cut a slot for it to come out the side....depending upon your need. For me...a table mount seems more flexible for most...so the torch will look something like a lamp.

 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The torch itself can be made of anything you wish to use. Anything bowl sized that is large enough and sturdy enough to support the fan. These fans are very quiet and don't seem to jingle. Under the primary bowl, I'll use some sort of pvc endcap, drilled out, to let it mount well on the primary pvc pole. Be very careful if you do any drilling on these. Anything works. You can use wood, foam, whatever to make the pieces.

 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
One very very important thing to remember....ventilation. You must allow for air to come up through the fan. This means the pipes have to be hollow. And it will probably require a few evenly spaced holes in the bottom of the flame bowl itself.

This image shows how I would mount a fan on a table top. With the wiring all the way through to conceal it...or notched out of the side of the pipe like a lamp if you wish.

 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Around the top of the torch...I'll try a heavy piece of plastic. The easiest source I can think of is a cheap plastic binder or folder sold at a office supply store. I can cut that with an exacto or a pair of sissors. This can then be rolled around and glued to the inside of the torch bowl.

 

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Evil, Wicked, Mean, Nasty
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
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