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Discussion Starter #1
I just built a Scary-Terry web shooter http://www.scary-terry.com/ggshooter/ggshooter.htm

Anyone have one? I think the possition of my air is off.. it was blowing lots of globs of glue.. I did get it to do some web but seems to toss big turds more than web..
Am I squeezing to much glue to fast? Anyone have a video of it in action? Maybe if you have one that works well you could post a close-up of the nozzle and air tube.
I couldn't find 3/16 copper so I used steel brake line.. adjustment are a bit hard but not impossible.
Thanks in advance
 

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I built a similar shooter last year based on Lotus's design he posted here on the HauntForum.

I had problem getting it adjusted too. Then I read a post about someone not using a webber setup at all but instead they just used just a standard air blower attachment and dripped a stream of glue into the the airstream to create the webs.

I tried that technique out this past weekend and it worked great. Basically what worked for me was to have a thin stream of glue hit the airstream and let it do the work. I used the same concept to adjust my webber. I moved the air tube away from the tip a bit and squeezed a small amount of glue out so that gravity pulls the glue stream into the air stream.

Moving the air tube away from the tip also seemed to keep the glue gun tip from cooling down which seemed to be contributing to "globbing". Slow and steady squeezing seems to the key.
 

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I built one similar to Scary Terrys design as well. I had to adjust the angle that the air is blowing. I had to find the right pressure when pushing the glue thru, once I did it was easy peasy web shooting.
 

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I just built a Scary-Terry web shooter http://www.scary-terry.com/ggshooter/ggshooter.htm

Anyone have one? I think the possition of my air is off.. it was blowing lots of globs of glue.. I did get it to do some web but seems to toss big turds more than web..
Am I squeezing to much glue to fast? Anyone have a video of it in action? Maybe if you have one that works well you could post a close-up of the nozzle and air tube.
I couldn't find 3/16 copper so I used steel brake line.. adjustment are a bit hard but not impossible.
Thanks in advance
I know that this is an old thread, but, hey, I'm a newby.

I just finished building the Scary Terry web shooter tonight. I get the same type of results.

I know that with some practice and tweaking of the air nozzle angle/distance it should work alright. But if anyone else with web-shooter experience can provide some advice/guidance on its use, I'd really appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It has to get very very hot and it cools off very very fast. Figure on spending a lot more time than you think letting it reheat between shoots. May be the glue as well, I have not tried low temp stuff, might better or worse. melts fast (good) cools off in the air to fast (bad) .. good luck with it!
 

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I will give you some tips (same as I gave Terry some time ago).

Having the air arc up to the tip as in ST pics, will cause agony.
Form the air line to run along the tip body as closely as possible.
You want the flow as close to parallel to the air outlet as possible.
Also, the end of the airline should be close to the nozzle tip, but not dead even with it. This layout will afford you finer webs, since you capture the glue in the airstream about as warm as possible.

OR

You can go with the drip and pray method.
Instead of bring the air close to the nozzle to take advantage of the heated glue, you have the air come parallel to the nozzle about .5-.75" below and about .5" behind the nozzle.
Your webs will be thicker over all due to transient cooling. If you tilt the gun one way or another without thinking you will loose the glue stream, also, at the wrong angles you will get gobs shooting off at bizarre tangents (don't shoot with kids or animals nearby using this method).

As Airscapes said, this is the lowest wattage a webber should be for effective operation. I can tell you at 70 degrees, you will be able to pass 40-60" of glue thru it before it needs to reheat, cooler, expect less. They are detail webbers, not meant to do huge areas in a hurry.

Also, keep a lint free cloth handy, wipe the nozzle of any collected glue frequently, hot glue attracts hot glue.
Also, hi or low temp glue makes NO DIFFERENCE. This measure relates to the "open" time - how long it is malleable to be used as an adhesive.

Ideally you want glues formulated to melt sub 400 degrees, the lower melt temp, the better it will work for you. Most readily available craft glues melt about 390.

If you want glues specifically formulated for webbers, I carry the most extensive American manufactured, fire safe and food safe glues available, made to my specifications. You can find those if you follow the link in my sig
 
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Thanks Liam.
I have gone from as little as 45 lbs and up to 110 lbs on the same gun.
It has to be the angle of the nozzle. It is probably just hitting the tip of the gun?

Just not sure on the wattage of the gun being used here and what sticks are being put through it?
 

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Thanks for your help airscapes, Corey, FE, and Liam. I re-adjusted the air nozzle, and it works a bit better.

I am using an 80W glue gun, 70psi, and "all purpose" glue sticks. The glue sticks don't say at what temperature they melt, but the caution says that the hot glue can reach 400 degrees, so I'm guessing that it fits the "readily available craft glue" category that Corey mentioned.

Do the specialty glue sticks that you guys provide melt at a lower temp (i.e. faster?) I really like the UV and glow in the dark concepts that I saw on your web pages.
Also, most of the descriptions on your sites call the glue sticks "1/2" inch. Is that just shorthand for .44 inch (standard craft glues that I saw?)
 

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Thanks for all that great info Corey. I built one last and it worked quite well but I'll follow your instructions this year to try and tweak it a bit.
 
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